Friday, September 24, 2021

Salish Sea News Week in Review September 24 2021

 


Aloha Happy Bluebird Friday!
Bluebirds are in the thrush family of birds, related to the American Robin. Native to North America, there are three types of bluebirds: eastern bluebird, western bluebird, and mountain bluebird. For thousands of years, they have been associated with happiness. Besides being known as both a harbinger and symbol of happiness, they are known as symbols of love, good health, cheerfulness, new births, and home. Today we celebrate them for all the joy and happiness they are associated with and bring.

At 50, Greenpeace is an environmental success story — with a daunting future
Today, the group with small beginnings in Vancouver has grown into one of the most recognizable environmental organizations in the world. Greenpeace has a presence in more than 55 countries, with nearly three million members globally.

The lessons for British Columbia in Alaska’s epic Bristol Bay sockeye
The world’s most abundant sockeye fishery is teeming with 10 million more fish than anticipated this year.

Sauk-Suiattle tribe sues Seattle City Light, demands it can’t call itself ‘green’
The Sauk-Suiattle Indian Tribe took the city of Seattle to task in a class-action lawsuit filed Friday on behalf of its members and the public, stating the electric utility’s green power claims are misleading and hurting the tribe.

Fairy Creek’s old-growth logging protests injunction remains temporarily: judge
A British Columbia Supreme Court judge suggested Thursday he will consider new options to address the future of an injunction against blockades by people opposed to logging old-growth trees on part of Vancouver Island. He said he will not deliver a decision Friday on the company’s application and his ruling will come after Sept. 26.

Valuable crab populations are in a ‘very scary’ decline in warming Bering Sea
King and snow crab populations in the Bering Sea have plummeted ahead of the harvest season, some by 99% compared to previous years.

What Canada’s environment and climate policies will look like under a Liberal minority government  From eliminating fossil fuel subsidies to support for nature-based climate solutions and protected areas, here are some key things we can expect from the new federal government.

Swinomish tribal members say steelhead net pens violate fishing rights, add their voice to state Supreme Court case
The Swinomish Tribe has joined as a friend of the court in a lawsuit to block permits that allow steelhead farming in a commercial net pen just offshore near Hope Island.

Southern resident grandmother orca 'missing and likely dead'
The Center for Whale Research has declared mother and grandmother L47, or Marina, in one of the Puget Sound’s endangered southern resident killer whale pods “missing and likely dead.” 

Orca census shows some improvement, but many whales still die before their time
The annual census of the endangered Southern Resident killer whales reports that the number of whales in L pod now totals 33, J pod has 24, and K pod has 16.

EPA Moves To Sharply Limit Potent Gases Used In Refrigerators And Air Conditioners
In what officials call a key step to combat climate change, the Environmental Protection Agency is sharply limiting domestic production and use of hydrofluorocarbons, highly potent greenhouse gases commonly used in refrigerators and air conditioners.

Even a green city like Bellingham has learned it’s not easy to cap demand for fossil fuel
In late 2019, mere weeks before the first U.S. case of coronavirus case was detected 60 miles south, the city council of Bellingham, Washington, gathered for a presentation from its Climate Protection Action Plan Task Force: nine community members charged with drawing up a road map for Bellingham to achieve its goals for cutting carbon emissions. Ysabelle Kempe reports. (Investigate What/Grist)

These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe at no cost to the weekday news clips, send your name and email to mikesato772 at gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow @savepugetsound

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

 

Friday, September 17, 2021

Salish Sea News Week in Review September 17 2021

[Ben Nelms/CBC]

Aloha Fall Weather Friday!
The National Weather Service of Seattle is predicting winds of up to 50 mph Friday through Saturday. Also in the forecast: 10 times the precipitation Seattle had all summer over just three days.The B.C. South Coast can expect about 50 millimetres of rainfall by Friday evening, but Environment Canada believes there is a chance there will be more and some areas could see 10 millimeters of rain in one hour. Duck, goose and beaver weather.


Scorched Earth: Why Washington wildfires are getting bigger
The wildfire trends are unmistakable in Washington state and around the western United States. There are more wildfires, they are bigger and they are more and more devastating.

An iconic tree is dying off in Whatcom — what’s causing it and how can you help save it?
The grim reaper is coming for the region’s Western redcedar. Across the Pacific Northwest, a concerning number of the species are dying, forest health experts say.

No longer a rainforest: B.C.’s Sunshine Coast improvises to survive long-term drought
As the area’s reservoirs continue to shrink, residents are experimenting with new ways to manage their relationship with watersheds.

Flying by the Fat of the Sea
Scientists may have cracked an essential secret of shorebirds’ marathon migrations. 

Recovery effort aims to restore pinto abalone mollusks that once flourished in Salish Sea
These pinto abalone are being raised by the tens of thousands in dozens of 30-gallon tanks at the Seattle Aquarium. It’s a conservation venture to restore a native species at grave risk of extinction in the Salish Sea.

No federal party offers clear path on how to wind down fossil fuel production
When asked about new scientific research showing much of the country’s oil, gas and coal should stay in the ground so that Canada meets its climate targets, none of the major parties were able to say how they plan to achieve this.

Trans Mountain Loses 16th Insurer as Industry Giant Chubb Walks Away
The world’s biggest publicly-traded provider of property and casualty insurance, Chubb, has become the 16th insurer to declare that it won’t back the controversial Trans Mountain pipeline, a coalition of climate and Indigenous campaigners announced yesterday.

Feds OK plan to cut salmon fishing when needed for orcas 
Federal officials have approved a plan that calls for cutting nontribal salmon fishing along the West Coast when the fish are needed to help the Northwest’s endangered killer whales.

With 3 pregnant J pod orcas, boaters told to keep away
With three pregnant J pod orcas in local waters, boaters are being asked to keep their distance and commercial tour operators are being told to stay at least a nautical half-mile from the whales.

Why are Columbia River steelhead having such a bad year?
The bottom has dropped out of the steelhead population this year, and the fish’s mysterious ocean life is making it harder to know why.

At Friday Harbor Labs, scientists give sea stars a chance to shine
At the UW's Friday Harbor Laboratories, scientists give sunflower sea stars a chance to shine.


These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe at no cost to the weekday news clips, send your name and email to mikesato772 at gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow @savepugetsound

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

Friday, September 10, 2021

Salish Sea News Week in Review September 10 2021

 

Aloha Large Hadron Collider Friday!
The world’s largest particle collider, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) was built by the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and first went live on this date in 2008. It is an 18-mile (27km) long experimental machine which passes through the French-Swiss border. The Collider was constructed to find the Higgs Boson particle, an elementary particle in physics.

Plugged in to the Salish Current?
Kids, the cohorts with the lowest vaccination rates, go back to the classroom. Read the story, "Pack a lunch, don a mask: kids go back to school in person as COVID-19 persists," this week's offering in Salish Current.  It's open-access, ad-free, independent, fact-based, nonpartisan, not-for-profit, reader-supported journalism serving the Whatcom, San Juan and Skagit community. Give it a try with a free subscription to our weekly newsletter: mikesato772@gmail.com

Ferruginous hawks in Washington deemed endangered
The number of ferruginous hawks in Washington continues to decline.

Wild Olympics legislation on upswing
Sen. Patty Murray has high hopes that Wild Olympics legislation will be approved by the U.S. Senate after a decade of trying and failing at congressional passage.

Sea cucumber die-off near Vancouver Island prompts fears of wasting disease that nearly wiped out sea stars
When Kathleen Reed descended for her usual weekly dive off the coast of Nanaimo, B.C., last Saturday she was shocked by how many dead sea cucumbers she saw. Reed has completed more than 500 dives and says she'd never seen so many of the deep red echinoderms turned pale, limp and slimy.

In North Cascades, researchers, climbers watch Washington’s snowpack quickly melt, exposing glaciers’ retreat
Washington has the most glaciers of any state in the Lower 48. These frozen reservoirs of freshwater keep alpine streams flowing through summer, cool the rivers for salmon making their seasonal spawning journeys and provide humans drinking water and hydropower.

Baby J pod orca ailing; whale-watch tours ordered to keep away
Baby orca J56 is ailing and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife has issued an emergency rule ordering commercial whale-watch tours to stay farther away to help her survive.

Marine Protected Area network off B.C. Coast could provide a template: West Coast Environmental Law
The federal government’s plan to conduct public consultations for a Marine Protected Area network off the coast of British Columbia could provide a template for how to manage oceans in the face of climate and ecological uncertainty.

From 4% to 45%: Biden Releases an Ambitious Plan for Solar Energy
The Biden administration on Wednesday released a plan to produce almost half of the nation’s electricity from the sun by 2050 as part of its effort to combat climate change.

With plenty of seals to eat, Bigg's orcas flooding Salish Sea; no longer regarded as 'transient'
The Orca Behaviour ­Institute based in Friday Harbor, ­Washington, says the Bigg’s orcas are in the Salish Sea in record numbers this year.

Fairy Creek logging protest surpasses Clayoquot Sound in arrests
The total surpasses the 856 arrests during protests against logging in Clayoquot Sound in 1993.

Swinomish threaten to sue over salmon habitat
The Swinomish Indian Tribal Community sent the Army Corps of Engineers on Thursday a 60-day notice of intent to sue over what it says is the corps’ failure to uphold the federal Endangered Species Act, according to a news release from the tribe.

EPA to protect Alaska’s Bristol Bay, blocking major gold mine
The Environmental Protection Agency said Thursday that it would restore protections for Alaska’s Bristol Bay, blocking the construction of a massive and controversial gold mine near the world’s largest sockeye salmon run.

These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe at no cost to the weekday news clips, send your name and email to mikesato772 at gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow @savepugetsound

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

Friday, September 3, 2021

Salish Sea News Week in Review September 3 2021

 

[PHOTO: Kathi Gillespie]

Aloha Food Bank Friday!
National Food Bank Day was created in 2017, to commemorate fifty years since the founding of St. Mary's Food Bank Alliance, the first food bank in the world, and to "recognize the outstanding contributions of food banks around the country". St. Mary's was founded by John ven Hengel in 1967, and its mission is to "alleviate hunger through the gathering and distribution of food while encouraging self-sufficiency, collaboration, advocacy and education."

Plugged in to the Salish Current?
Interested in what's going on up north in Whatcom, San Juan and Skagit counties? Check out "No new reservations, for now: Living and working around ferry delays, cancellations in the San Juans." The Salish Current: Open-access, ad-free, independent, fact-based, nonpartisan, not-for-profit, reader-supported journalism serving the Whatcom, San Juan and Skagit community. Give it a try with a free subscription: mikesato772@gmail.com

How Clayoquot Sound’s War in the Woods transformed a region
Almost 30 years after the ‘war in the woods’ stopped most industrial logging in Clayoquot Sound, the area has experienced a massive tourist boom.

Record-low steelhead returns on Columbia River prompt call for fishing shutdown
Columbia River steelhead are in hot water. The number of steelhead returning from the Pacific Ocean to the river this year is the lowest ever recorded.

Inside the latest Indigenous push to stop a massive copper mine
For nearly 20 years, plans to mine near the world’s largest sockeye salmon fishery have alternately raced forward and backward, with more whiplash than resolution for residents and fishermen in southwest Alaska’s Bristol Bay region.

Kelp is struggling in central and south Puget Sound. Are Whatcom’s kelp beds next? 
... Thriving bull kelp can also soften the blow of climate change, with Washington state’s bull kelp forests absorbing 27 to 136 metric tons of carbon each day, according to the Puget Sound Restoration Fund.

Federal judge throws out Trump administration rule allowing the draining and filling of streams, marshes and wetlands
A federal judge on Monday threw out a major Trump administration rule scaling back federal protections for streams, marshes and wetlands across the U.S., reversing one of the previous administration’s most significant environmental rollbacks.

Biden Opens New Federal Office for Climate Change, Health and Equity
The Office of Climate Change and Health Equity, which the administration announced on Monday, will be the first federal program aimed specifically at understanding how planet-warming greenhouse gas emissions from burning fossil fuels also affect human health.

Majority of British Columbians in new survey say no way to B.C. name change
Most B.C. residents don't want the name of their home province to be changed to reflect the area's Indigenous heritage, according to a survey created by Research Co.

Norwegian company plans large new salmon farm for B.C.’s coast as others phased out
First Nations who successfully fought to remove open-net pen salmon farms are speaking out against a proposal by Grieg Seafood and the Tlowitsis First Nation, saying they have not been consulted and fear wild salmon stocks will suffer if a new farm is approved.

Like a Hotel California for Fish
Unearthed weirs in K’ómoks territory offer a window into an ingenious past technology for a sustainable coastal fishery. Brian Payton writes. (The Tyee)


These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe at no cost to the weekday news clips, send your name and email to mikesato772 at gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow @savepugetsound

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told


Friday, August 27, 2021

Salish Sea News Week in Review August 27 2021

 


Jan-ken-po Day
Rock paper scissors is usually played by two people, often when something needs to be chosen, such as whose turn is next. Hands are made into the shape of a rock, piece of paper, or scissors. Rock breaks scissors, paper covers rock, and scissors cuts paper. A similar game was first mentioned in Wuzazu, a book by Xie Zhaozhi, a Chinese writer of the Ming dynasty. Known as shousiling, the game was said to date back to the Han dynasty which ranged from 206 BCE to 220 CE. Hand signal games traveled from China to Japan in the seventeenth century, where they became known as sansukumi-ken, and rose in popularity. "Ken" meant fist games, "san" meant three-way, and "sukami" meant deadlock. There were variations of the games, the earliest being mushi-ken. The first form of the game to use symbols for rock, paper, and scissors was jan-ken. Created in the late nineteenth century, the modern version of the game is derived from it.


‘It’s pretty dire’: Vancouver Island salmon under threat from climate change-induced droughts 
As the island enters the most severe level of drought in the province, experts warn B.C. has much work to do to manage for watershed health in the midst of prolonged dry spells.

Taking the temperature of salmon
Warming waters threaten the recovery of salmon in Puget Sound. New findings about stream temperature could help salmon survive the threats of climate change.

After mystery sea star die-off, could captive breeding rebalance California’s underwater forests?
Without sea stars, an explosion of sea urchins knocked the ecosystem off balance. Now scientists are racing to breed a new generation of their predators.

Skagit County sues Seattle for public records in fight over fish passage at city dams
A fight over the lack of fish passage at Seattle City Light dams escalated Tuesday when Skagit County sued the city of Seattle in a bid to force the release of some of the utility’s financial records.

B.C.’s extreme heat is here to stay. Critics say government’s plan to deal with it is dangerously weak
From 570 devastating heat-induced deaths, to fish die-offs, to berries being baked on the stem, British Columbians are experiencing the multitude impacts of a growing climate emergency that the province urgently needs to adapt to.

Expert says B.C. sea stars melting away because of wasting disease
A new study published by the Royal Society said sea stars are getting close to extinction as waters along the west coast.

Fairy Creek is set to become the largest act of civil disobedience in Canada’s history
Amid escalating tensions with the RCMP, old-growth logging blockades on Vancouver Island show no signs of letting up. B.C.’s response, experts say, will determine the legacy of the new war in the woods.

An Amazon Rainforest of the sea fights for survival beneath Puget Sound
An undersea expedition to a mysterious world beneath the waves has come to West Seattle's Lincoln Park. It's just one stop on a week-long mission to help understand and save one of our area's most important natural resources, its kelp forests.

Discovery of tire-related chemical that kills coho salmon sparks widespread response
Scientists, legislators and manufacturers are responding in various ways to the recent groundbreaking discovery of a deadly chemical derived from automobile tires, a chemical that can rapidly kill coho salmon swimming in urban streams.


These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe at no cost to the weekday news clips, send your name and email to mikesato772 at gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow @savepugetsound

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

Friday, August 20, 2021

Salish Sea News Week in Review August 20 2021

 


Aloha Mosquito Friday!

World Mosquito Day takes place on the anniversary of the day in 1897 when British doctor Sir Ronald Ross discovered that the female Anopheles mosquitoes transmit malaria between humans. This led to scientists ability to better understand the relationship between mosquitoes and diseases, and what could be done to combat it. In 1902, Ross received the Nobel Prize for medicine for his work.


US Bureau of Land Management reconsiders protecting 10 million acres of sage grouse habitat
The Obama administration temporarily enacted a plan to withdraw what are called “sagebrush focal areas” from mining and drilling during the president’s second term, but called for a full environmental review to make the withdrawal permanent. The Trump administration, upon taking office, abandoned that plan, opening those 10 million acres for business.

Extinction of B.C. Interior steelhead runs imminent: experts
Only 19 spawning adults returned to the Chilcotin watershed this spring, down from 418 in 2015 and a peak of 3,149 in 1985.

Did the oldest male southern resident orca die too young — at just 35?
He was last seen struggling against the current, terribly emaciated, one of the skinniest orcas ever seen alive.

Ghost boats are haunting Puget Sound waters
It can cost over $10,000 to properly dispose of a boat that is no longer in working order. Some owners are choosing to abandon ship instead; causing big problems for marina managers and the environment.

Skeptics of sea otter reintroduction getting organized on Pacific Coast
Sea otters are undeniably cute, but cuteness only goes so far when major economic interests are at stake.

They want to tell the real history, celebrate vibrant people of the Coast Salish
Robert Jago wants Northwesterners to learn the real history of this land.

Biden to nominate Umatilla tribal leader Chuck Sams to direct National Park Service
On Wednesday, President Joe Biden announced his intent to nominate Oregon tribal leader Charles “Chuck” Sams III to direct the National Park Service.

Skinny orcas are up to 3 times more likely to die than healthy whales, new research shows
Skinny southern resident killer whales are two to three times more likely to die in the next year than whales in a healthy condition, new research shows.

Court Blocks a Vast Alaskan Drilling Project, Citing Climate Dangers
The multibillion-dollar ConocoPhillips plan, known as Willow, was approved under the Trump administration and then legally supported by the Biden administration.

EPA bans pesticide chlorpyrifos for use on food crops
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Wednesday announced it will stop the use of the pesticide chlorpyrifos on all edible crops.

Duwamish River Cleanup Coalition calls on EPA to maintain standards set in 2014 
A polluted river runs through the heart of industrial Seattle. The Lower Duwamish waterway was designated a Superfund site in 2001.

Namu the Killer Whale premieres at Orpheum Theatre in Seattle on August 1, 1966.
On August 1, 1966, at a charity event at the Orpheum Theatre in Seattle, an audience views the first showing of the movie Namu the Killer Whale.


These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe at no cost to the weekday news clips, send your name and email to mikesato772 at gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow @savepugetsound

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

Friday, August 13, 2021

Salish Sea News Week in Review August 13 2021


Aloha Friday the 13th!

Friday the 13th is considered an unlucky day in Western superstition. According to folklore historian Donald Dossey, the unlucky nature of the number "13" originated with a Norse myth about 12 gods having a dinner party in Valhalla. The trickster god Loki, who was not invited, arrived as the 13th guest, and arranged for Höðr to shoot Balder with a mistletoe-tipped arrow. Dossey: "Balder died, and the whole Earth got dark. The whole Earth mourned. It was a bad, unlucky day." This major event in Norse mythology caused the number 13 to be considered unlucky. (Wikipedia)

Judge hears lawsuit over fish farms
Whether Cooke Aquaculture’s plan to raise native steelhead at fish farms in Puget Sound is a simple business transition or a complex threat to the marine ecosystem is being debated in King County Superior Court.

Male southern resident killer whale possibly dead from cancer, says expert
The endangered southern resident killer whale population may have suffered more loss with one of the orcas presumed dead, says an expert.

Forest defenders present 150,000-name petition to stop old-growth logging
Environmentalists and the B.C. Green party are demanding the provincial government implement the promises it made to preserve B.C.’s forests, starting with putting an immediate end to old-growth logging.

This is the most sobering report card yet on climate change and Earth’s future. Here’s what you need to know
There is little good news in the 3,900 pages of text released today. But there is still time to avert the worst of the climate catastrophe — if humanity chooses to.

Ottawa says it must maximize revenue from the Trans Mountain pipeline to fight climate change
Minister of Environment and Climate Change Jonathan Wilkinson said today that revenue generated by the project will help Canada achieve its long-term climate objectives.

U.S. Senate infrastructure package could ‘significantly improve’ salmon habitat
The $1 trillion infrastructure package includes $1 billion over a five-year period to help states remove pipes, known as culverts, that allow streams to flow under roadways.

Swinomish, regional tribal leader Lorraine Loomis dies at 81
Longtime tribal fisheries advocate Lorraine Loomis of the Swinomish Indian Tribal Community died Tuesday. She was 81.

Shellfish farmers line up for disaster aid after heat wave decimates oysters and clams 
Sixty shellfish farms in Washington state have applied for federal disaster aid after a double whammy of extreme heat and afternoon low tides killed most of their oysters and clams in June.

From Delta to Hope, 85% of B.C.’s lower Fraser salmon habitat no longer accessible to declining fish populations
Using field manuals from 170 years ago, scientists have identified the monumental impact human development has had on B.C.’s struggling Fraser salmon — and what can be done to reverse it.

Olympia City Council wants Capitol Lake to become an estuary
The Olympia City Council has decided to support a plan to allow Capitol Lake to revert to an estuary.

Canada commits $340 million to Indigenous protected areas, guardians programs
The federal government announced it will provide funding over the next five years to support Indigenous-led stewardship of lands and waters under its $2.3 billion commitment to nature conservation. Matt Simmons reports.


These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe at no cost to the weekday news clips, send your name and email to mikesato772 at gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow @savepugetsound

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

 

Friday, August 6, 2021

Salish Sea News Week in Review 8/6/21

 



Hiroshima Friday
On August 6, 1945, at 2:45 a.m., the Enola Gay, a B-29 bomber, took off from Tinian Island in the Mariana Islands. It was flown by Lt. Col. Paul W. Tibbets—who had named the plane after his mother—and carried an atomic bomb called "Little Boy." At 8:16 a.m., the bomb was dropped over the city of Hiroshima. It exploded at an altitude of 1,900 feet, above a hospital. It released the equivalent of 12,500 tons of TNT and destroyed over four square miles of the city, leveling about 62,000 of Hiroshima's 90,000 buildings. Around 80,000 to 90,000 people were killed on impact, and another 60,000 died by the end of the year on account of radiation sickness and other injuries sustained from the blast.


DFO report suggests alternatives to open-net salmon farms in B.C.
B.C. wild salmon advocates are calling on the federal government to expedite the transition away from open-net pen salmon farming, following a federal government report that outlined suggestions from stakeholders.

Southern resident orca near Washington state presumed dead
An orca is presumed dead after being found in distress last week in the Strait of Juan de Fuca, a body of water that separates Washington state from Canada, officials said.

Critical Habitat for Southern Resident Killer Whales 
NOAA Fisheries has revised the critical habitat designation for Southern Resident killer whales.

Washington tribe calls on Seattle City Light to remove the Gorge Dam
To help salmon and free a culturally important stretch of the Skagit River, the Upper Skagit tribe demands that Seattle tear down the dam.

To Save A Huge, 24-Armed Sea Creature, Scientists Become Loving Foster Parents
On an island off the coast of Washington state, scientists have resorted to breeding sunflower sea stars in a lab.

Fine particulate air pollution associated with higher risk of dementia
Using data from two large, long-running study projects in the Puget Sound region — one that began in the late 1970s measuring air pollution and another on risk factors for dementia that began in 1994 — University of Washington researchers identified a link between air pollution and dementia.

The Greenland ice sheet experienced a massive melting event last week
Last week, a heat wave spurred Greenland’s biggest melting event of the 2021 season so far. The Polar Portal, run by Danish research institutions, stated that enough water melted to cover all of Florida with two inches of water.

BC’s Shellfish Farmers Struggle After Heat Wave Decimates Oysters
The heat dome exposed significant gaps in crop support, says an industry advocate.

These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe at no cost to the weekday news clips, send your name and email to mikesato772 at gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow @savepugetsound

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

Friday, July 30, 2021

Salish Sea News Week in Review July 30 2021

 


Aloha Friendship Friday!

The United Nations General Assembly proclaimed July 30 each year to be the International Day of Friendship. On this day, the United Nations encourages governments, international organizations, and other groups to hold events that promote dialogue among civilizations, understanding, solidarity, and reconciliation. One focus is on involving those who will become the future leaders—young people—in community activities that "promote international understanding and respect for diversity." If those diverse friendships can be built, then the participants' respective countries and the world will benefit for years to come.


B.C.’s rare inland rainforest at risk of collapse, international scientists warn in new study
The province’s unique inland temperate rainforest is home to endangered species and cedar trees more than 1,000 years old — but its old-growth ecosystems could be destroyed in less than a decade if logging continues at its current pace.

White House lays out environmental justice guidance 
Two big themes of the first six months of the Joe Biden administration have been racial equity — the focus of one of the first executive orders the president signed — and environmental infrastructure, a big part of the infrastructure bill working its way through Congress. On Wednesday, those themes came together.

Wildfires, floods and rock slides force pause on permanent fishway project at Big Bar landslide site
Efforts to create a permanent safe passage for fish at the Big Bar landslide site are being delayed as a number of incidents have made work challenging and in some cases, dangerous for crews.

Underwater video shows heat-stressed salmon, but it could have been worse
June’s heat wave led to some unhealthy hot water for salmon. But, fish managers said it hasn’t been as devastating for salmon runs as the warm water temperatures were in 2015.

Monsanto Hit With $185M Verdict Over Teachers’ PCB-Related Brain Damage
A Washington state court jury sacked Bayer AG’s Monsanto unit with a $185 million verdict on Tuesday in a lawsuit filed by teachers exposed to toxic chemicals in a dilapidated school.

J-Pod returns to Salish Sea after 'unprecedented' 108-day absence
 J-Pod is back in town. The group of endangered southern resident killer whales was spotted Tuesday near Sooke travelling eastbound on inland waters toward Victoria.

Years in the making, amendments ban new fossil-fuel industries, new shipping terminals at Cherry Point
No new oil, natural gas or coal-based industries will be allowed at Cherry Point west of Ferndale under Whatcom County’s latest — and groundbreaking — Comprehensive Plan amendments, following a unanimous vote by the county council.

Lummi Nation totem pole arrives in D.C. after journey to sacred lands across U.S.
A 25-foot totem pole, intricately hand-carved and painted by Native Americans, arrived in the nation’s capital Wednesday afternoon after a two-week cross-country journey from Washington state, as part of a campaign to protect sacred tribal lands.


These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe at no cost to the weekday news clips, send your name and email to mikesato772 at gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow @savepugetsound

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

Friday, July 23, 2021

Salish Sea News Week in Review July 23 2021

 


Aloha Comet Hale-Bopp Friday!
Comet Hale–Bopp is a comet that was perhaps the most widely observed of the 20th century and one of the brightest seen for many decades. Alan Hale and Thomas Bopp discovered Comet Hale–Bopp separately on July 23, 1995, before it became visible to the naked eye.
Wikipedia

Fish can get hooked on meth, a troubling sign of how the drug can pollute water
Methamphetamine use is on the rise worldwide. According to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, approximately 27 million people use meth and similar drugs each year. But meth use doesn’t just take a toll on people — it can harm animals, too.

Seattle study of breast milk from 50 women finds chemical used in food wrappers, firefighting foam
In August 2019, Vera Harrington put a quarter cup of her breast milk into the refrigerator. She gave this milk not to her daughter, Flora, but a team of researchers investigating a pervasive class of chemicals that have found their way into humans all over the world.

B.C. First Nation and partners propose new $10B LNG megaproject
A First Nation in British Columbia is proposing a new liquified natural gas (LNG) export facility to be built on the community's treaty land and is making an environmental pledge to reach net-zero emissions within three years of commencing operations.

Lower Elwha restoration project in progress
The Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe is conducting a beach restoration project at the former Olympic Rowing Club site on Ediz Hook through mid-August.

Salmon-killing tires get congressional hearing
A study that pinpointed a chemical from car tires as the cause of salmon die-offs in West Coast creeks has prompted a congressional hearing.

With rollback of Trump proposal, new Biden plan cuts just 2% of spotted owl protections
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing to withdraw the previous administration’s rule that slashed millions of acres of critical habitat protections for the northern spotted owl.

100 Days Without Js: J-Pod Absent from Core Summer Habitat for 100 Days and Counting
J-Pod was last seen in the San Juan Islands on April 10th. K-Pod made a brief visit to the Salish Sea on July 1 before heading back west to the outer coast; other than that, K-Pod and L-Pod have not been documented in inland waters since late February.

Caroline F. Gibson February 6, 1964 - July 11, 2021
Caroline passed away at home with her partner Walt and her sister Mary Jane by her side in Port Townsend on July 11, 2021 following a lengthy battle with cancer.

What ever happened to the Salish woolly dog? Learn more about this extinct breed with virtual history lessons
Senaqwila Wyss wants people to know what really happened to the furry companions of her people.

Low oxygen levels off Northwest coast raise fears of marine ‘dead zones’
Low oxygen levels measured off the coast of Oregon and Washington are raising fears of large “dead zones” that could wipe out crabs and bottom-dwelling fish within.

State investigating deaths of deer in Anacortes
A disease the state Department of Fish and Wildlife determined in early June was killing deer on the San Juan Islands is now believed to be affecting deer in Anacortes.

Canada’s sweeping closures of Pacific coast salmon fisheries leave workers reeling
Commercial fishers are paying the price for 'collective failure' to minimize impacts to wild salmon populations, says watchdog.

Feds approve 32 studies in dam relicensing process
The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, which oversees the licensing of hydroelectric dams, issued last week a study plan determination for the relicensing of Seattle City Light’s three-dam Skagit River Hydroelectric Project.


These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe at no cost to the weekday news clips or to this weekly compilation, send your name and email to mikesato772 at gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow @savepugetsound

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

Friday, July 16, 2021

Salish Sea News Week in Review July 16 2021

 

 



Aloha World Snake Friday!
There are more than 3,000 snake species, and snakes can be found on every continent except Antarctica. They live in most countries, although they aren't found on a few island countries like Iceland, Ireland, and New Zealand, or on the autonomous island territory of Greenland. Snakes live in almost any environment: in forests, grasslands, deserts, savannas, swamps, and mountain regions. About 70 species of sea snakes even live in water, being found in the Indian and Pacific oceans. The largest snake is the reticulated python, which may reach over 30 feet in length; the smallest is the threadsnake, which is less than four inches long. World Snake Day raises awareness about snakes and educates the public about them; it dispels fears and misconceptions about them and enlightens the public on how they should be dealt with. A focus is often put on conservation, which is valuable because snakes face habitat loss on account of development, and there are around 100 species that are listed as endangered by the IUCN Red List.


Marbled murrelet gets endangered status in Oregon as climate change threatens its survival
The Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission voted Friday to reclassify the marbled murrelet’s status from threatened to endangered under the Oregon Endangered Species Act.

At Meadowdale Beach, the salmon will return to a new estuary
One day not long from now, threatened salmon species will return to Lunds Gulch at Meadowdale Beach Park. After a decade of planning, construction has begun on renovations at the waterfront park to create a 1.3-acre pocket estuary that will bring back Chinook, chum and coho salmon, as well as cutthroat trout.

Clock starts on Nooksack basin water rights inventory; stakeholders yet to discuss solutions
Weeks of sparse rainfall and a historic heat wave marked the end of June — and the start of a process to establish water rights among various users in Whatcom County’s Nooksack River basin.

Newly discovered fungus spores spurred by heat and drought are killing Seattle street trees
...So-called sooty bark disease is named for the black, powdery patches that are the telltale marks on tree bark of the fungus Crypotostroma corticale.

Canada and the United States release new action plan for Salish Sea Ecosystem
...Today, the governments of Canada and the United States announced that they have signed a new four-year "Action Plan" under their Joint Statement of Cooperation—first signed in 2000—that commits both countries to work together on transboundary issues and challenges facing the Salish Sea ecosystem.

How healthy is the Salish Sea? Canada-U.S. study tracks ecosystem decline
A joint Canada-U.S. report on the health of the Salish Sea has found either an overwhelming decline or stable trend in nine out of 10 environmental indicators tracked by researchers. The only positive? Shellfish.

This Bellingham Bay cleanup is taking longer than expected. Here’s why
The city of Bellingham has big plans to clean up two former industrial sites, transforming the waterfront area into a public access point informally called Cornwall Beach Park....The cleanup planning process has been in the works for nearly a decade, due to lengthy bureaucratic processes at the city, state and federal levels.

Can biologists estimate the massive loss of shellfish caused by low tides, high temps?
The putrid smell of rotting shellfish on some beaches in Puget Sound and elsewhere along the West Coast were a clear sign that large numbers of clams, mussels, oysters and other intertidal creatures were killed from exposure to extreme low tides, record-breaking temperatures and a blazing hot sun.

Drought emergency declared in Washington state
Washington Gov. Jay Inslee on Wednesday declared a statewide drought emergency because of hot, dry conditions that have plagued the region and water supply.

Biden to Restore Protections for Tongass National Forest in Alaska
Former President Donald J. Trump invited mining and logging to a vast wilderness of bald eagles, black bears and 800-year-old trees. President Biden is reversing course.

A Study Predicts Record Flooding In The 2030s, And It's Partly Because Of The Moon
A new study on high tide flooding predicts that the mid-2030s could be catastrophically wet in U.S. coastal regions — and it could stay that way for an entire decade.

Ship crash in Vancouver harbour blamed on 'systematic failure,' communications 'breakdowns'
A federal investigation into two bulk carrier ships that crashed in Vancouver's Inner Harbour two years ago has blamed the collision on "breakdowns in situational awareness and communications."

Hot NW summer: More high temps and low precipitation ahead
Crews are trying to contain wildfires that have already burned tens of thousands of acres throughout the Northwest. The already dire situation is being made worse by gusting winds, a lack of rain, and above-average heat. The coming months aren't likely to be much better.

Fully vaccinated Americans may enter Canada as of mid-August
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said on Thursday Canada could start allowing fully vaccinated Americans into Canada as of mid-August for non-essential travel and should be in a position to welcome fully vaccinated travelers from all countries by early September.


These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe at no cost to the weekday news clips or to this weekly compilation, send your name and email to mikesato772 at gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow @savepugetsound

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

Friday, July 9, 2021

Salish Sea News Week in Review July 9 2021

 

 


Aloha Donkey Kong Friday!
Donkey Kong was released by Nintendo in 1981, featuring the adventures of the eponymous ape created by Shigeru Miyamoto and the debut of Nintendo's Mario as Jumpman.

Survivor: Salmon Edition
Pink salmon are competitive—for food, for mates, and for space to spawn. Today, pinks are the most abundant of all Pacific salmon species, but what lies ahead for them in a time of rapid climate change?

Canadian governments have spent $23 billion supporting three pipelines since 2018: report
A new report finds Canadian governments have provided billions to support pipelines — none of which have been completed to date — even as experts worry pipelines themselves undermine progress on climate goals.

Record heat, drought threaten even the toughest survivors: L25, the oldest orca, and the winter Chinook she depends on
...No one really knows when she was born, but if her estimated birth year of 1928 is correct or even close, L25 has been traveling the seas of our region over uncounted miles for some 93 years.

Washington court rules in favor of conservation groups in fight over cattle lots and groundwater 
It’s back to the drawing board for state regulators, after the Washington Court of Appeals ordered the Department of Ecology to rework permits for confined animal feeding operations, known as CAFOs.

Inslee declares wildfire state of emergency, burn ban
Gov. Jay Inslee on Tuesday declared a state of emergency throughout Washington relating to the growing risk of wildfires, including a statewide prohibition on most outdoor and agricultural burning through Sept. 30.

More than a billion seashore animals may have cooked to death in B.C. heat wave, says UBC researcher 
Shoreline temps above 50 C and low tides led to mass deaths of animals like mussels, clams, sea stars.

Extreme heat cooks shellfish alive on Puget Sound beaches
A record-shattering heat wave June 26-28 coincided with some of the year's lowest tides on Puget Sound.

Study: Northwest heat wave impossible without climate change
The deadly heat wave that roasted the Pacific Northwest and western Canada was virtually impossible without human-caused climate change that added a few extra degrees to the record-smashing temperatures.

Historic summit of tribes across Pacific Northwest presses dam removal on Inslee, Biden, Congress
In a historic gathering of more than 15 Indian nations, tribal leaders from around the Northwest called for immediate action to save endangered orcas and the salmon they depend on.

Gulf Islands under some of the worst water shortages ever, authorities say
After this summer's unprecedented heat wave across B.C., authorities in the Gulf Islands say the season's drought is one of the worst they've experienced in recent memory.


These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe at no cost to the weekday news clips or to this weekly compilation, send your name and email to mikesato772 at gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow @savepugetsound

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

Friday, July 2, 2021

Salish Sea News Week in Review July 2 2021

 




Aloha Flag Friday!

Iris versicolor is also commonly known as the blue flag, harlequin blueflag, larger blue flag, northern blue flag, and poison flag, plus other variations of these names, and in Britain and Ireland as purple iris. It is a species of Iris native to North America, in the Eastern United States and Eastern Canada. Wave on! (Wikipedia)

Justices deny Wyoming, Montana coal suit against Washington state

Pacific Northwest heat wave sets up ‘grim’ migration for salmon on Columbia, Snake rivers

Washington state board to uphold temperature limits in Columbia, Snake rivers

Environmentalists hope for silver lining to Seattle’s surging A/C demands

Ottawa to close 60 per cent of commercial salmon fisheries in B.C., Yukon to conserve stocks

$4 million donation helps save unique Salish Sea island ecosystems

Inside the Pacheedaht Nation’s stand on Fairy Creek logging blockades

NW tribes want to be at the table for green energy planning

Public comment sought on net pen aquaculture 

How to make a trap for Asian giant hornets — and why one Puyallup teen has already made 40 of them

Orca takes Camano family by surprise pushing, spinning boat in Saratoga Passage

Mass bird death event in Seattle attributed to record heat Monday

Canada lobbies against California proposal to protect boreal forests, respect Indigenous Rights

Now, your weekend tug weather--
Now, your weekend tug weather--
West Entrance U.S. Waters Strait Of Juan De Fuca-  212 AM PDT Fri Jul 2 2021   
TODAY
 Light wind becoming NW 5 to 15 kt in the afternoon. Wind  waves less than 1 ft becoming 2 ft or less in the afternoon. W  swell 5 ft at 9 seconds. 
TONIGHT
 W wind 5 to 15 kt in the evening becoming light. Wind  waves 2 ft or less. W swell 5 ft at 8 seconds. 
SAT
 Light wind becoming NW 5 to 15 kt in the afternoon. Wind  waves less than 1 ft becoming 2 ft or less in the afternoon. W  swell 5 ft at 8 seconds. 
SAT NIGHT
 W wind 5 to 15 kt becoming SW to 10 kt after  midnight. Wind waves 2 ft or less. W swell 6 ft at 8 seconds. 
SUN
 SE wind to 10 kt becoming W in the afternoon. Wind waves  2 ft or less. W swell 6 ft at 8 seconds.


These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe at no cost to the weekday news clips or to this weekly compilation, send your name and email to mikesato772 at gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow @savepugetsound

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

Friday, June 25, 2021

Salish Sea News Week in Review June 25 2021

 


Aloha National Catfish Day!
Living catfishes constitute nearly 2,900 species placed in about 35 families. The majority of species inhabit fresh water, but a few, belonging to the families Ariidae and Plotosidae, are marine. Freshwater catfishes are almost worldwide in distribution and live in a variety of habitats from slow or stagnant waters to fast mountain streams; marine catfishes are found in the shore waters of the tropics. Catfishes are generally bottom dwellers, more active by night than by day. Most are scavengers and feed on almost any kind of animal or vegetable matter.

More than 100 celebrities, prominent Canadians ask B.C. premier to preserve remaining old-growth forest
More than 100 prominent Canadians — and a few international celebrities — have signed an open letter to British Columbia Premier John Horgan demanding he preserve the province's remaining old-growth forests.

Your Fourth of July celebrations are likely polluting local air and water. Here’s how
As you enjoy watching fireworks this Fourth of July, consider the toll they’re taking on the environment, including nearby air quality, bodies of water and wildlife.

B.C. gets a C grade in protecting land and oceans: report
B.C. may be doing some things right when it comes to protecting the environment, but not enough to receive top marks, says a new environmental report card.

Endangered orcas missing from their home waters for 10 weeks
Southern resident killer whales haven’t been seen in their home waters for more than two months now.

Site C dam, oilsands pushing Canada’s largest national park closer to endangered list
Despite repeated calls for action from the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, Canada has failed to adequately protect Wood Buffalo National Park, home to the world’s largest inland delta, from the impacts of industrial development.

Federal court: Puyallup River dam needs permits under Endangered Species Act before it can restart
In another blow to the operators of the Electron Dam on the Puyallup River, a judge in federal District Court has barred its parent company from diverting any water to generate power until it gets permits under the Endangered Species Act. 

The Record Temperatures Enveloping The West Are Not Your Average Heat Wave
...It gets hot in the summer. But this record-setting heat wave's remarkable power, size and unusually early appearance is giving meteorologists and climate experts yet more cause for concern about the routinization of extreme weather in an era of climate change.

More info for the feds coming on Delta port expansion
The citizens’ group Against Port Expansion (APE) continues its push for the federal government to turn down the Port of Vancouver’s proposed Terminal 2 (T2) project at Roberts Bank.

BC Looks like an LNG Loser: Report 
Once touted as an economic powerhouse, the liquified natural gas industry is on the rocks, according to a worldwide survey of LNG terminals from the Global Energy Monitor, a non-profit research group responding to climate change.

Work at Big Bar slide site means Fraser River salmon should have better chance this year
On the two-year anniversary of the discovery of the massive Big Bar landslide on the Fraser River, officials say they are seeing some success in remediating the devastation caused to the river's native salmon.

Hot salmon: Heat wave brings concern for Northwest water temps as memory of 2015 die-off looms
As the mercury climbs this weekend, water temperatures are also expected to increase. Warmer waters can spell bad news for salmon, especially if the temperatures stay warm for long periods of time. For salmon, temps above 68 degrees Fahrenheit can be dangerously warm. The fish will often take refuge in cooler areas, like tributaries. Courtney Flatt reports. (KNKX)


These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe at no cost to the weekday news clips or to this weekly compilation, send your name and email to mikesato772 at gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow @savepugetsound

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

Friday, June 18, 2021

Salish Sea News Week in Review June 18 2021

 

 


Aloha Go Fish Day!
Observed annually on June 18, National Go Fishing Day is a great day to take time from your daily routine to find a stream, a lake or pond, bait your hook, cast your line and catch a fish or two (or ten). Fishing is a recreational pastime of many, and if you’re lucky, you can bring home a fresh catch.

Biden officials move to reinstate Alaska roadless rule, overturning Trump policy
The Biden administration said Friday that it would “repeal or replace” a rule allowing roads and other types of development in more than half of Alaska’s Tongass National Forest, reviving 20-year-old protections President Donald Trump had stripped three months before leaving office.

Federal judge upholds decision to deny permits to expanded Belfair gravel mine
A federal judge has upheld a decision by the Mason County Hearing Examiner to overturn a surface mining permit for a 66.5-acre gravel mine in Belfair.

Coastal logging needs old-growth for at least next decade, forester says
 Forestry companies on the coast are dependent on old-growth logging for at least the next decade because second-growth trees aren’t yet big enough to be harvested, says the co-author of an old-growth strategic review.

Federal effort would list Mount Rainier white-tailed ptarmigan as threatened species
The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service is proposing new protections for the Mount Rainier white-tailed ptarmigan. If approved, the Endangered Species Act would list the birds as threatened.

Tiny specks bring big hope that ocean is improving after the devastating ‘Blob’
... for the first time since a devastating marine heat wave that peaked through 2014 and 2015, researchers see in the abundance, condition and diversity of plankton recently sampled off the West Coast signs of a change for the better in ocean conditions.

Federal Judge Says Biden Cannot Pause New Leases for Drilling on Public Lands
A federal judge in Louisiana has blocked the Biden administration’s suspension of new oil and gas leases on federal lands and waters, in the first major legal roadblock for President Biden’s quest to cut fossil fuel pollution and conserve public lands.

Site prep underway at contested development near Mukilteo
Construction preparation has begun again at a controversial development site south of Mukilteo. And this time, it’s under the direction of a new developer. Lennar Northwest paid $24 million for the roughly 22 acres known as Frognal Estates.

Biden to sign bill making Juneteenth a federal holiday
The United States will soon have a new federal holiday commemorating the end of slavery. The House voted 415-14 on Wednesday to make Juneteenth, or June 19th, the 12th federal holiday, and President Joe Biden is scheduled to sign the bill into law on Thursday.

Researchers identify shellfish-killing phytoplankton behind massive summer die-offs in Puget Sound
In July of 2018 and 2019, large numbers of oysters, cockles and clams died on beaches all around Puget Sound. No one knew why.


These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe at no cost to the weekday news clips or to this weekly compilation, send your name and email to mikesato772 at gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow @savepugetsound

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told