Friday, January 21, 2022

Salish Sea News Week in Review January 21 2022


Aloha Squirrel Friday!

Squirrels are one of the most common animals that people see on a regular basis. These little creatures with a fluffy tail are practically everywhere–in cities, parks, college campuses and forests. They might live in trees or dig a hole in the ground to serve as a home. Some people might even say that squirrels are nuts for nuts, and can last through the harshest of winters without much trouble at all. Squirrels are part of the Sciuridae family, which makes them cousins to a variety of rodents such as chipmunks, groundhogs, prairie dogs and other rodents. The earliest fossils of squirrels date back to the Eocene epoch which was perhaps more than 30 million years ago. National Squirrel Appreciation Day was founded by wildlife rehabilitator Christy Hargrove, who is affiliated with the North Carolina Nature Center.

The Nooksack River is in “grave danger,” warns Whatcom scientist with numbers to back it up
The Nooksack River is in “grave danger” of experiencing irreversible changes and ecosystem collapse if Whatcom County doesn’t rapidly reform the way it manages nearby human activity.

Vancouver Park Board chair proposes co-management of parks with First Nations
A motion calling for the co-management of parks that fall within the traditional territories of Vancouver's First Nations communities will be debated at a park board meeting later this month.

At deadly Glacier Peak, one last hurdle for new seismometers
Snohomish County’s Glacier Peak, classified as one of America’s deadliest volcanoes, is a step closer to getting adequate seismometers to detect future eruptions.

The inescapable power of water on a landslide-prone street
A little over a week ago, a landslide in Seattle’s Magnolia neighborhood pushed a home off its foundations. Perkins Lane is a tiny little street that runs along the side of Magnolia Hill.

"No shortage of questions to be answered" for region's shrinking orca population
While scientists, wildlife managers and others continue to untangle the complex web of fish, boat and water quality issues that affect the health of Southern Resident orca whales, the population remains endangered — and continues to shrink.

Bill to ramp up recycling a top priority for green coalition in 2022 Washington state legislative session
... Senate Bill 5665, called the "Lorraine Loomis Act" seeks to help restore salmon runs by improving tree shade that can improve cooling around streams where the fish spawn and may rear and would also establish a conservation grant program for stream-side zones.

Fish processor says it's closing Surrey plant after federal decision to phase out salmon farms
One of the largest farmed salmon producers operating in British Columbia says it's permanently closing its processing plant in Surrey, B.C., because of a federal government decision to phase out some fish farms.

Mining company drops rights to Upper Skagit watershed in key preservation step
The British Columbia government has announced the surrender of mining rights at the headwaters of the Skagit River, following yearslong controversy over protection of one of the region’s premier salmon rivers.

Deal reached between B.C. First Nations and forestry company to defer old-growth logging
Logging will be temporarily deferred in approximately 2,500 hectares of old-growth forest following an agreement between four Vancouver Island First Nations and a forestry company.

An orphaned orca brought a community together — and still inspires 20 years after her rescue
Twenty years ago this month, a baby orca was discovered near Seattle. She was lost and alone, unhealthy and lingering dangerously close to the Vashon Island ferry dock. Six months later, a community effort successfully returned her to her family off Vancouver Island, Canada.

Washington Gov. Inslee declares European green crab emergency
Washington Governor Jay Inslee has authorized emergency actions to combat an infestation of European green crabs.

Thousands of pigs that drowned on B.C. farm no threat to environment
The pigs were among approximately 600,000 animals that died on Sumas Prairie in late November.

'The whole landscape has changed:' Parks, trails and rec sites destroyed by B.C. storms
Access to some parts of the B.C. backcountry will likely be "restricted" this summer as assessments are still underway.


These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe at no cost to the weekday news clips, send your name and email to mikesato772 at gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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Friday, January 14, 2022

Salish Sea News Week in Review January 14 2022

Aloha Kite Day!
International Kite Day started in India, where it takes place in the northwestern state of Gujarat, and is most widely celebrated in the city of Ahmedabad. The festival is known as Uttarayan in the Hindi language, and it is also called Makar Sakranti in parts of India. It celebrates the changing of the seasons from winter to summer, as well the upcoming harvest of winter crops. People come from countries all over the world to celebrate. The kites that are associated with the festival symbolize the spirit of gods awakening after their winter sleep.

Trans Mountain Pipeline Faces Scrutiny on Soil Stability, Fraser River Impact
The federal Crown corporation building the Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion has been handed a seven-day deadline to answer tough questions about soil stability, drilling method, and environmental impacts after proposing to redrill and reroute part of a 1.5-kilometre tunnel beneath the Fraser River.

Sea level on steroids: Record tides flood Washington coastlines
Some of the highest tides ever recorded hit Seattle and much of the Washington coast this week. High tides in Port Townsend, Seattle, and Tacoma on Friday were nearly two feet higher than forecast.

The Great Bear Rainforest’s Great Big Whales
British Columbia’s Kitimat fjord is an unlikely home for massive fin whales, and scientists are beginning to understand what makes the area so attractive.

WA legislators prepare for long list of climate change bills
Lawmakers could look at more than a dozen climate proposals addressing carbon reduction and other environmental issues. John Stang reports.

Criminal charges filed in Puyallup River pollution case. Dam operator faces jail time, fines
The Washington State Attorney General’s Office filed 36 criminal charges Monday against Orting’s Electron Hydro dam operator after turf polluted the Puyallup River during a construction project in 2020.

Can salmon eggs survive Washington's heavy floods?
When rivers flood, it can damage the salmon eggs held within them, setting back those populations.

‘We need to learn to do things faster’: Canada’s new environment minister talks climate — and compromise
From overseeing 2030 targets to phasing out fossil fuel subsidies, Steven Guilbeault has been tasked with one of the largest to-do lists of the entire federal cabinet.

Ocean warmth sets record high in 2021 as a result of greenhouse gas emissions
Since the late 1980s, Earth’s oceans have warmed at a rate eight times faster than the preceding decades.

B.C. environmental, rights groups welcome court win over RCMP delay in approving watchdog report
B.C. Civil Liberties Association took force to court over 3½-year wait for review of monitoring complaint.

State Supreme Court OKs steelhead farming
The state Supreme Court published a unanimous decision by its nine judges Thursday to uphold the state Department of Fish and Wildlife's approval of steelhead farming in Puget Sound.

Still No Penalties for Coastal GasLink Environmental Violations
More than a year after Coastal GasLink was cited for multiple environmental violations on its pipeline route through northern B.C., the provincial government still hasn’t imposed penalties.


These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe at no cost to the weekday news clips, send your name and email to mikesato772 at gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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Friday, January 7, 2022

Salish Sea News Week in Review January 7 2022

 


Aloha Bobblehead Friday!
For over 100 years, bobbleheads have been entertaining and fascinating fans and collectors. Early bobbleheads, known as bobbers or nodders, developed from Germany. They took root in the United States pop culture in the 1950s and '60s. Bobbleheads resurged in the late 1990s when professional sports teams began using them as promotional items.


Ecology, EPA now under the gun to adopt new water quality criteria for aquatic creatures
Long delays in updating state water-quality standards to protect orcas, fish and other aquatic species appear to have finally caught up with the Washington Department of Ecology and its federal counterpart, the Environmental Protection Agency.

Here are 7 things experts say could make B.C.'s cities more climate-proof
After a year of cascading climate disasters in the province, experts are calling on B.C.'s provincial government and other authorities to shore up long-term housing and urban design strategies to make sure they are climate-resilient.

Sea Star Protection Poised to Alter California Coastal Plans
The National Marine Fisheries Service said Monday that it found merit in the Center for Biological Diversity’s petition to protect the sea star and will decide by August whether to list it under the Endangered Species Act.

The Snoqualmie Tribe asks for support to protect their most sacred site
The tribe says helicopter tours disrupt traditional ceremony and prayer at Snoqualmie Falls.

With Oil Unreliable, Refinery Communities Deserve a Transition Plan
The long-term stability of Washington’s five oil refineries is in doubt. But that doesn’t mean the workers and local communities who support this industry have to share its fate.

China’s Surprisingly Robust System of Marine Protection
An international group of researchers has compiled the first database of marine conservation efforts in the country, and it is more extensive than many expected.

Shellfish war: Judge dismisses Tulalip clam-traffick
A day before a trial pitting tribal treaty rights against state law enforcement, a Skagit County Superior Court judge dismissed felony charges against a Tulalip council member and another tribal member who, in turn, accused the state of targeting Native American fishermen.

For the first time in over 30 years, the EPA adds to its list of hazardous air pollutants
The Environmental Protection Agency has declared a powerful dry-cleaning solvent, 1-bromopropane, too dangerous to breathe. It marks the first time it's expanded its hazardous air pollutant list since 1990.

‘They are supposed to protect us’: Community wants more from EPA for Duwamish Superfund cleanup
...New plans to complete a cleanup where the Duwamish meets Elliott Bay and Puget Sound are under discussion, and contested.


These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe at no cost to the weekday news clips, send your name and email to mikesato772 at gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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Friday, December 31, 2021

Salish Sea News Week in Review 12/31/21


Aloha New Year 2022!
Salish Sea News and Weather says 'aloha' to 2021 and 'aloha' to 2022, wishing you good health and safe passage in the new year. Mike Sato.

Alaska experiences record-high temperature for December, freezing rain
Kodiak soared to 67 degrees on Sunday, while other towns are experiencing anomalous rain. Matthew Cappucci and Emily Schwing reports. (Washington Post)

For the Northwest, climate change was hard to ignore in 2021
2021 brought some of the most extreme weather events ever seen in the Pacific Northwest — or anywhere. From heat domes to record-breaking rainfall, climate change was hard to ignore in Washington. John Ryan reports. (KUOW)

How 2021′s floods and heat waves are signs of what’s to come
In 2021, extremely rare weather disasters became alarmingly common. Lauren Sommer reports. (NPR)

What were the costliest extreme weather events in 2021?
The full cost of flooding in B.C. is still being assessed, but according to one estimate, November flooding places B.C. as the world's fifth most expensive extreme weather event in 2021. Stefan Labbé reports. (Times Colonist)

‘The salmon will come back again’: First Nations document devastating low returns on B.C.’s central coast
Fifty years ago, an average of 47,000 salmon returned annually to the Neekas River north of Bella Bella. In 2021, the 750 salmon returning to the once-teeming waterway act as a fresh warning to local First Nations that urgent action is needed — at both the provincial and federal level — to prevent total population collapse. Stephanie Wood reports. (The Narwhal)

A shellfish company gets into the weeds
The Swinomish Indian Tribal Community shows how eelgrass and aquaculture can coexist in Puget Sound. Sarah Sax reports. (High County News)

Rising Seas and Shifting Sands: Combining Natural and Grey Infrastructure to Protect Canada’s Coastal Communities
A report on how Canada can scale-up the use of  nature-based solutions, in tandem
with grey infrastructure, to protect communities along the East and West coastlines. (University of Waterloo, Intact Centre on Climate Adaptation)

Conservation groups see mounting success in B.C. with private land acquisitions
Donations from $5 to $500,000 offer 'direct' results toward protecting biodiversity. Chad Pawson reports. (CBC)

Salmon habitat to increase after conservation group buys land near South Prairie Creek A piece of property near South Prairie Creek in Buckley will soon become a part of a floodplain restoration project, which benefit salmon and improve habitat. Forterra, a local nonprofit land conservation agency, announced Dec. 23 that it acquired 33 acres of privately owned property adjacent to an existing 134-acre South Prairie Creek Preserve. Angelica Relente reports. (Tacoma News Tribune)

What we learned this year about human waste and Puget Sound
The waste that 4.5 million Seattle-area people flush affects shellfish, wastewater regulations and more. Hannah Weinberger reports. (Crosscut)

Sewage spills contaminates Percival Creek, Capitol Lake
About 735 gallons of sewage streamed into the Tumwater stormwater system and then into Percival Creek on Monday. The county attributed the spill to a blockage in a sanitary sewer line on Somerset Hill Drive Southwest. Martin Bilbao reports. (The Olympian)

Snow geese and winter waterfowl flock to Skagit fields and skies
One of the Northwest’s great natural treasures is the abundant flocks of winter waterfowl that come here in the colder months — and they are easy to spot on open fields. Hit the road for Skagit County, and odds are good that you’ll find some. Bellamy Pailthorp reports. (KNKX)


These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe at no cost to the weekday news clips, send your name and email to mikesato772 at gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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Thursday, December 23, 2021

Salish Sea News Week in Review December 23 2021



Aloha Yule log Friday!
A Yule log or bûche de Noël is a traditional Christmas cake, often served as a dessert near Christmas, especially in France, Belgium, Switzerland, and several former French colonies such as Canada, Vietnam, and Lebanon. Variants are also served in the United States, United Kingdom, Portugal, and Spain.
Wikipedia

Adapting to Climate Change Will Only Get More Expensive
A new estimate puts the cost of adapting and repairing coastal infrastructure damaged by climate change in the United States at hundreds of billions annually.

Lots of derelict vessels in Kitsap, few funds to deal with them
At least 18 derelict boats are sitting on the Kitsap shoreline of Puget Sound, according to a recent count by the Kitsap County Sheriff's Office.

Wet'suwet'en protesters block Coastal GasLink site again, 1 month after RCMP crackdown
One month after the high-profile arrests of dozens people on Wet'suwet'en territory, a group identifying themselves as land defenders returned Sunday to reoccupy a protest camp, blocking access to a Coastal GasLink pipeline drill site in northern British Columbia.

In 2021, climate ambitions soared and crashed in US and around the world
After four years of near-silence about climate change in the White House, 2021 brought an abrupt shift.

Navy releases jet noise monitoring study
The Navy’s noise monitoring report that is dated Nov. 30 concludes that the modeling it used to predict the impact of aircraft noise, such as for the EIS for NAS Whidbey Island, is accurate. In fact, according to the report, monitoring data shows jet operations often create less of an impact than modeling suggested.

A ghost river showed its face during the recent Nooksack floods
The Nooksack River starts in small streams around the base of Mount Baker, and empties into Bellingham Bay on Puget Sound. But a few hundred years ago, it used to flow north into Canada.

Timber company returns 2 miles of waterfront property to Squaxin Island Tribe
Port Blakely Companies, a family-owned company with timber operations in the U.S. and New Zealand, has returned 2 miles of waterfront and 125 acres of tidelands on Little Skookum Inlet in Mason County to the Squaxin Island Tribe, at no cost.

Nonprofit donated more than 200 acres on Nisqually River for threatened woodpecker 
A Washington-native threatened woodpecker will be getting a new preserve along the Nisqually River, after 265 acres were donated to an environmental nonprofit.

Whatcom farmers face manure management challenges after flooding
Flooding in Whatcom and Skagit counties in November put major stress on local dairies, including lost animals and lost revenues for some. Now there’s another hurdle: With storage lagoons overtopping, where can they store all that manure?


These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe at no cost to the weekday news clips, send your name and email to mikesato772 at gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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Friday, December 17, 2021

Salish Sea News Week in Review December 17, 2021



Aloha Simpson Family Friday!
On this day in 1989, the first episode of The Simpsons aired. The popular American animated series directed by Matt Groening is set in the fictional town of Springfield and it follows the life of the Simpson family. (The rest is history.)

Archaeologists Have Unearthed Exciting Secrets on Haida Gwaii
Archaeological excavations have revealed the oldest domestic dog remains ever reported in the Americas, roughly 11,000-year-old stone tools, and the tantalizing signs of far more to come.

What killed millions of honey bees at this Everett farm?
In the summer, a beekeeper lost 240 hives on Ebey Island. An investigation found they died from pesticides, but whose?

Road to Recovery: How a Victoria company became the first carbon neutral whale watching business in Canada
Eagle Wing Tours prides itself on being the first — and still the only — carbon-neutral whale watching company in Canada.

Jay Inslee, Washington lawmakers propose electric vehicle rebates and other climate initiatives ahead of legislative session
Gov. Jay Inslee Monday rolled out his latest plans to fight climate change, including an idea to spend $100 million annually to fund rebates for people buying electric vehicles.

Seagrass wasting disease is fueled by climate change
Seagrass is suffering from a wasting disease across the Pacific Northwest, and climate change is driving the destructive outbreak, according to a new study from Cornell University.

Washington state’s next ferry officially has a name 
The next Washington state ferry will bear the name Wishkah when it sails in 2024.

Natural gas furnaces, water heaters in crosshairs of some Northwest policymakers
Fossil fuel use in buildings looks to be the next frontier for climate activists at the state and local level. There's a convergence of activity in the Pacific Northwest aimed at phasing out natural gas furnaces and water heaters.

Cascadia’s Chance for a Zero-Carbon Future: What We Learned
Lessons from a year of reporting on climate solutions for the bioregion spanning BC, Washington and Oregon.

Gov. Inslee unveils new $187 million plan for Washington salmon recovery
Gov. Jay Inslee wants to invest $187 million in salmon recovery as part of his 2022 budget and policy proposals.

Federal magistrate finds flaws in Navy environmental study of Growler jet impacts
A U.S. federal magistrate has found that the Navy in an environmental impact statement “turned a blind” eye to data that did not support the goal of increasing Growler jet operations from an air station at Whidbey Island.

21-day TMX shutdown a warning of how vulnerable the fuel supply is to climate change disasters
After the longest shutdown in its 70-year history, the Trans Mountain pipeline restarted Sunday, but won't be at full capacity or pressure until January, according to engineers.

Swinomish Tribe wants to resurrect U.S. clam gardening
With climate change threatening culturally important foods, a Puget Sound tribe pushes to build the country's first clam garden of the modern era.

Federal government announces closure of most Pacific herring fisheries
Most commercial fisheries for Pacific herring on the West Coast have been closed with the exception of harvests by First Nations for food and ceremonial purposes.

Washington launches program to cut underwater noise in Puget Sound
Quiet Sound plans to work with the Northwest shipping industry to make it easier for marine creatures to navigate, find food and communicate.


These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe at no cost to the weekday news clips, send your name and email to mikesato772 at gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow @savepugetsound

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Friday, December 10, 2021

Salish Sea News Week in Review December 10 2021



Aloha Human Rights Friday!
The Universal Declaration of Human Rights was adopted on December 10, 1948, and Human Rights Day commemorates this event and takes place on its anniversary. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights lays out a foundation for a more just world, and details a broad range of fundamental rights and freedoms that everyone is entitled to, "without distinction of any kind, such as race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status." It "sets out universal values and a common standard of achievement for all peoples and all nations" and "establishes the equal dignity and worth of every person."

Trans Mountain pipeline to restart Monday after shutdown during B.C. floods
The Trans Mountain pipeline is set to restart Monday after record-setting rainfall, devastating flooding and landslides last month prompted a three-week precautionary shutdown that led to fuel rationing in parts of B.C.

Voter redistricting maps by commission can go forth, WA Supreme Court says
In a surprise order Friday morning, the Washington Supreme Court declined to take on the job of drafting new congressional and legislative maps.

Fish passage, dam removal studied as Seattle City Light aims to relicense three Skagit River dams
As Seattle City Light moves to extend its use of the dams for another 30 to 50 years, at stake is the cost and supply of cheap, carbon-neutral power from the dams...Now tribes and other river users are pushing City Light to do more for salmon in this round of relicensing.

It could take weeks to unload damaged containers from Zim Kingston cargo ship
Removing 60 containers ­damaged by fire and rough weather aboard the cargo ship Zim Kingston could take up to 12 days and involve multiple ­salvage contractors, and safety and regulatory agencies, says the Port of Nanaimo.

Coastal GasLink failed to fix nearly 2 dozen environmental violations along pipeline route, B.C. officials say 
Officials have flagged numerous, ongoing environmental violations by Coastal GasLink that could harm sensitive waterways along the pipeline's route through northern B.C.

Tacoma adopts Climate Action Plan to eliminate carbon emissions and save $4 billion by 2050 
On Nov. 30, Tacoma City Council made the decision to approve a 2030 Climate Action Plan they say will keep the city on the course to achieving zero emissions by 2050.

Retreating glaciers could create new salmon habitat, B.C. study shows
The retreat of glaciers in the Pacific mountains of British Columbia and Alaska could produce thousands of kilometres of potential new salmon habitat, a study led by researchers at Simon Fraser University shows.

Northwest Environmental Advocates Sues EPA Over Water Quality Impairment
On Tuesday, plaintiff Northwest Environmental Advocates filed a suit against the Environmental Protection Agency claiming that they have impaired the water quality in Puget Sound in Washington state.

A 2022 Agenda for Cascadia’s Climate Dreams
There are many decarbonization goals the bioregion can act on right now. Here are 25.

B.C. floods caused at least $450M in damage, insurance bureau says
The Insurance Bureau of Canada estimates the insured damage caused by flooding in British Columbia last month at $450 million, calling it the "most costly severe weather event in the province's history."

Shoreline becomes latest city to ban natural gas in new buildings
The Shoreline City Council unanimously approved a new energy code on Monday that prohibits most uses of fossil fuels in new commercial buildings and larger residential buildings.


These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe at no cost to the weekday news clips, send your name and email to mikesato772 at gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

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