Friday, September 13, 2019

Salish Sea News Week in Review September 13 2019

Aloha Harvest Moon Friday!
A Harvest Moon occurs on Friday the 13th, making for a spooky night just ahead of the start of fall — the season of haunted hayrides and Halloween. The full moon that occurs closest to the autumnal equinox is called a Harvest Moon. Autumn officially begins on September 23 at 3:50 a.m. EDT. However, this year's Harvest Moon is unlike most in that it will coincide with Friday the 13th. (CBS News) Shine on!

Trump Administration to Finalize Rollback of Clean Water Protections
The Trump administration on Thursday is expected to complete the legal repeal of a major Obama-era clean water regulation, which had placed limits on polluting chemicals that could be used near streams, wetlands and water bodies.

Feds give new scrutiny to clash between Whidbey Island Navy jets and endangered seabirds
What happens when a reclusive seabird is spooked by a close encounter with a low-flying Navy Growler jet? The Navy and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), under pressure from state Attorney General Bob Ferguson, will take another look at the effects on the marbled murrelet of an increasing number of  EA18-G Growler training flights out of Air Station Whidbey Island.

New viruses discovered in endangered wild Pacific salmon populations
Three new viruses—including one from a group of viruses never before shown to infect fish—have been discovered in endangered Chinook and sockeye salmon populations. While the impact of the viruses on salmon health isn’t yet known, all three are related to viruses that cause serious disease in other species.

B.C. carbon pollution rises 1.2 per cent in most recent report B.C.’s progress in reducing greenhouse gas emissions over the past decade has been virtually wiped out due to large increases in carbon pollution the last two years, according to new government data released Monday. 
 
Another vital forest at risk: Scientists fear warming water could be killing off Puget Sound’s kelp beds 
Dozens of healthy bull kelp off Owen Beach stretched to the surface, trailing a moppish tangle of algae. It looked like overgrown clumps of pad thai had gone out to sunbathe.


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These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato (@) salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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Friday, September 6, 2019

Salish Sea News Week in Review September 6, 2019

Aloha Food Bank Friday!
National Food Bank Day was created in 2017, to commemorate fifty years since the founding of St. Mary's Food Bank Alliance, the first food bank in the world, and to "recognize the outstanding contributions of food banks around the country." Many food banks offer educational opportunities to help people restart their lives, and many of those who regain their footing return to volunteer at the food banks that helped them. Celebrate the day by making a food or monetary donation to a food bank or food pantry and by volunteering. "Meet each need with dignity."


New marine heat wave resembles killer 'Blob' that devastated sea life on West Coast, NOAA says
A new marine heat wave has formed off the West Coast that is similar to “The Blob” that devastated sea life and ravaged runs of Pacific salmon. Although the similarities are striking, whether the new system will cause the same havoc is yet to be seen.

New permit could address excess-nitrogen threat to Puget Sound
Nitrogen from sewage-treatment plants, along with other nutrient sources, are known to trigger plankton blooms that lead to dangerous low-oxygen conditions in Puget Sound — a phenomenon that has been studied for years. Now state environmental officials are working on a plan that could eventually limit the amount of nitrogen released in sewage effluent.

Salmon swimming freely through Fraser River landslide site, officials say
Large numbers of sockeye and chinook salmon have started to swim freely through a section of the Fraser River that had been blocked by a landslide, officials announced Wednesday.

Federal Court allows six of 12 Trans Mountain pipeline project appeals
The Federal Court of Appeal has allowed six challenges of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion focusing on Indigenous consultation to proceed, while dismissing several claims centred on environmental concerns.

Erich Hoyt returns for Orca Tour 2019
Erich Hoyt, author of the expanded, new edition of Orca: The Whale Called Killer, returns for a series of lectures hosted by The Whale Museum in West Seattle (9/19), Friday Harbor, WA (9/24), and Saturna B.C. (9/28).


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These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato (@) salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow @savepugetsound

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told