Friday, August 16, 2019

Salish Sea News Week in Review August 16 2019

Aloha Tell A Joke Friday
A man was pulled over by a police officer who said, “Sir, you are weaving all over the road. Have you been drinking?” The man said with a slurred voice, “Officer, I have only been drinking water.” The officer asked for the bottle of water and smelled it. “This isn’t water, it’s wine!” The man looked at the police officer with astonishment and said, “The good Lord did it again!”



Both orca babies alive, all 3 southern resident pods seen in Canadian waters
Researchers documented this week that both babies in the southern resident killer whale pods are still alive.


No end date in sight for crews working at Big Bar landslide in B.C. 
Officials working at a landslide northwest of Kamloops say they don't know how long efforts to rescue spawning salmon will take on the Fraser River.


Kitsap County next to ban single-use plastic shopping bags
Kitsap County commissioners on Monday unanimously passed an ordinance to limit the distribution of thin, film-like plastic bags.

States Sue Trump Administration Over Rollback of Obama-Era Climate Rule
A coalition of 29 states and cities on Tuesday sued to block the Trump administration from easing restrictions on coal-burning power plants.

New Trump rules weaken wildlife protections
The Trump administration took its final step Monday to weaken the Endangered Species Act, a bedrock law that brought the bald eagle, the American alligator, the California condor, the humpback whale and the grizzly bear back from the brink of extinction.

Liberals launch next phase of engagement with Indigenous groups over Trans Mountain pipeline 
The federal government has launched a new phase of engagement with Indigenous groups on the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project.


Slowly slipping away.’ Fewest Sockeye salmon ever counted at Ballard Locks
Sockeye salmon are returning to Lake Washington in the smallest numbers since record-keeping started. Disastrous year for sockeye predicted Fishermen of all stripes – commercial, First Nations and recreational – should brace themselves for what could be an epic bad year for sockeye. Salmon at ‘scary’ low levels in area rivers as fishing season opens on the Puyallup Around 1,800 wild chinook are expected to come back to the Puyallup this year, along with 13,000 hatchery chinook. The forecast for pink salmon... is especially low this year.


These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato (@) salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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Friday, August 9, 2019

Salish Sea News Week in Review, August 9 2019

Aloha Nagasaki Memorial Friday
3 days after the United States dropped an atomic bomb on the Japanese city of Hiroshima, the city of Nagasaki was destroyed on August 9 1045 by a 21 kiloton atomic bomb nicknamed Fat Boy. About 40 to 80 thousand people were estimated killed during this American-led attack towards the end of the Second World War. A few days later on August 15, Japan surrendered to the Allies, effectively bringing the War to a close by September, 1945.


Three more orca deaths takes census count down to 73 Southern Residents
Four orca deaths and two births over the past year brings the official population of southern resident killer whales to 73 — the lowest number since the annual census was launched in 1976.

Biologist warns it's 'past the time' to act for Southern resident killer whales
Many called it a "tour of grief" when orca J35 or “Tahlequah” captivated the world by pushing her dead calf for a thousand miles over 17 days around the Salish Sea. A year later, biologist Ken Balcomb said nothing significant has changed to keep the endangered Southern resident killer whales from disappearing forever.


Where are the salmon and the orcas? Tribe, scientists grapple with unprecedented disappearance in Washington waters
...Tuesday marks a month since the southern residents were last seen in their usual home waters in and around the San Juan Islands. Usually present nearly every day at this time of year, the orcas have shown up only a handful of times this year, and then, only for brief visits before quickly leaving again for waters of the outer coast.


NOAA adds to overfished list
Changes in the environment, including warming waters, are prompting the U.S. government to add eight populations of fish — including three populations of coho salmon in Washington state — to its federal overfished list, scientists with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said.


Peaceful pipeline protesters return to Burnaby Mountain on B.C. Day
Activists spent B.C. Day up on Burnaby Mountain protesting the Kinder Morgan Expansion. Construction on the $7.5-billion project has been given the go-ahead from the National Energy Board and is expected to resume soon.

These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato (@) salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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Friday, August 2, 2019

Salish Sea News Week in Review August 2 2019

Aloha Dinosaur Friday!
Dinosaurs first appeared about 245 million years ago, at the beginning of the Middle Triassic Epoch, and existed for about 180 million years, going extinct about 66 million years ago at the end of the Cretaceous Period. The period when they lived is called the Mesozoic Era. Richard Owen, an English anatomist, came up with the word "Dinosauria" in 1842. The word comes from the Greek word "deinos," meaning terrible or fearfully great, and "sauros," meaning reptile or lizard.

July was Earth’s hottest month on record, beating or tying July 2016
July was Earth’s hottest month ever recorded, “on a par with, and possibly marginally higher” than the previous warmest month, which was July 2016, according to provisional data from the Copernicus Climate Change Service.


Salal’s Worrisome Die-Off 
...
in recent months, reports of dead and dying salal in British Columbia have accumulated. More troubling is that no one knows for sure what’s killing the plant.


Study: In breaching Snake River dams, benefits outweigh costs
A new study is further dividing Washington state after concluding the benefits of breaching four dams on the lower Snake River outweigh the costs, both physically and to communities.

No timeline for opening of natural passage for salmon bottleneck on Fraser River 
Officials say they're working as quickly as possible but can't determine if they're on track to create a natural passage at the site of a Fraser River landslide that would allow salmon to reach their spawning grounds.

Trump EPA yanks Obama-era proposal to restrict mine development in salmon-rich Bristol Bay region
The Environmental Protection Agency scuttled proposed development restrictions Tuesday on an open-pit mine in the headwaters of Alaska’s Bristol Bay region, which sustains the largest sockeye salmon runs in the world.

B.C. First Nation buys 5 per cent stake in clean-energy projects worth $2.5 billion
A First Nation in northwest British Columbia says an investment in clean-energy projects worth more than $2.5 billion represents a historic move toward its economic independence.

EPA's move to ease state water quality rules welcomed by pulp industry
In what industry officials are calling good news for local pulp and paper mills, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency signed a proposal Tuesday to roll back “unattainable” water quality standards. Also known as the fish consumption rule, Washington’s clean water rule is intended to protect the health of people and fish and to manage pollution caused by industries and municipalities.

These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato (@) salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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Friday, July 26, 2019

Salish Sea News Week in Review July 26, 2019

Salish Sea News Week in Review
July 26, 2019

Aloha July Ruby Friday!
Rubies, the birthstone of July, are considered the king of gems and represent love, health and wisdom. It was believed wearing a fine red Ruby bestowed good fortune on its owner. A Ruby is the most valuable gemstone and its value increases based on its color and quality. (Wixon Jewelers)

Cost to replace salmon-blocking culverts running into billions, WSDOT says
The taxpayers’ cost to comply with a federal court order to improve salmon habitat by repairing state culverts has ballooned from $1.9 billion to $3.8 billion over the past dozen years, officials told legislators Thursday.

Trans Mountain construction work can go ahead as National Energy Board re-validates permits
The National Energy Board has cleared the way for construction to resume on portions of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project by re-validating all the orders and decisions it enjoyed before its permits were overturned last year.

Indigenous-led group submits unsolicited bid to buy Trans Mountain pipeline
Indigenous-led group Project Reconciliation has submitted a preliminary proposal to the federal government to buy the Trans Mountain pipeline.

Critics appalled as controversial Tacoma LNG plant moves closer to final approval
Puget Sound Energy’s liquefied natural gas project on Tacoma’s Tideflats is one step closer to completion.

Mother orca Tahlequah and her dead calf, one year later. How did she change the conversation?
It was a year ago Wednesday that mother orca Tahlequah rallied attention to the plight of endangered southern resident killer whales and their struggle for survival.

Montana, N. Dakota seek to block Washington state rail law
Attorneys general for North Dakota and Montana asked the Trump administration on Wednesday to overrule a Washington state law that imposed new restrictions on oil trains from the Northern Plains to guard against explosive derailments.

Feds look again at reintroducing grizzly bears to North Cascades
The on-again, off-again effort to return grizzly bears to North Cascades National Park is back on.

Climate change: Current heating 'unparalleled' in 2,000 years 
The speed and extent of current global warming exceeds any similar event in the past 2,000 years, researchers say.

These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato (@) salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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Friday, July 19, 2019

Salish Sea News Week in Review July 19 2019

Salish Sea News Week in Review
July 19 2019

Aloha Moonwalk Friday!
July 20, 2019 marks a half-century since Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landed on the moon.


Scorecard Spurs WA Cities to Control Stormwater Pollution
After years of work, cities in Washington are doing more to protect Puget Sound from its biggest source of pollution: stormwater runoff.

'This is unprecedented': Alert, Nunavut, is warmer than Victoria
Weather watchers are focused on the world's most northerly community, which is in the middle of a record-breaking heat wave.

World experienced hottest June on record in 2019, says US agency
The world experienced its hottest June on record last month, with an average temperature worldwide of 61.6F (16.4C), according to new data.

High speed rail from Vancouver to Seattle, Portland 'worth the investment,' study says
A new study looking into high speed rail between cities in British Columbia and Washington state says it's financially viable.

Operating costs rise by millions for new sewage treatment plant: staff report
Costs to operate and maintain the Capital Regional District’s new sewage treatment project will be millions of dollars a year more than originally forecast,

U.S. company fined nearly $3M for 2016 fuel spill in B.C. First Nation's fishing territory
A Texas-based company has been fined over $2.9 million in penalties after pleading guilty to a diesel spill from a tugboat that ran aground and sank in a First Nation's fishing territory on B.C.'s Central Coast.


Salish Sea Orcas are going elsewhere for fish  It looks like endangered Orcas that reside around Puget Sound… may be residing somewhere else.


'We're losing time': Tl'azt'en First Nation very concerned about rock slide blocking salmon run
A rock slide blocking a narrow part of Fraser River just west of Clinton, about 100 kilometres northwest of Kamloops, has members of the Tl'azt'en First Nation very concerned that salmon that are already endangered won't be able to migrate to Northern B.C. this summer.


E.P.A. Won’t Ban Chlorpyrifos, Pesticide Tied to Children’s Health Problems
The Trump administration took a major step to weaken the regulation of toxic chemicals on Thursday when the Environmental Protection Agency announced that it would not ban a widely used pesticide that its own experts have linked to serious health problems in children.


These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato (@) salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

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Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

Friday, July 12, 2019

Salish Sea News Week in Review July 12 2019

Salish Sea News Week in Review
July 12 2019

PHOTO: Andrew Sutton
Aloha Blue Whale Friday!
The blue whale is a marine mammal belonging to the baleen whale parvorder, Mysticeti. At up to 29.9 metres in length and with a maximum recorded weight of 173 tonnes, it is the largest animal known to have ever existed. (Wikipedia) See: 'In the presence of greatness': Rare sighting of blue whale off B.C. coast 
 

It's a girl: Researchers get closer look at J pod orca baby
A new baby orca born to J pod is a female, researchers have confirmed. The baby whale, probably born May 24, 2019, is designated J56 and her mother is J31, a 24-year-old.


Best way to fight climate change? Plant a trillion trees
The most effective way to fight global warming is to plant lots of trees, a study says. A trillion of them, maybe more. And there’s enough room, Swiss scientists say.

Army divers begin Puget Sound clean up to benefit fish and wildlife
A new collaboration between the state Department of Natural Resources and the U.S. Army's 569th Engineer Dive Detachment will help improve wildlife habitat in Puget Sound waters by removing derelict fishing nets beginning Monday.

First Nations launch new court challenge to Trans Mountain pipeline
Six First Nations that have filed another legal challenge against the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion say Canada's ownership of the corporation behind the project created a bias that prevented full consultations as ordered by the Federal Court of Appeal.

Washington state sues Navy over expansion of Growler jet training on Whidbey Island 
The Navy’s expansion of loud, low-flying Growler jet training flights on Whidbey Island drew a lawsuit on Tuesday from Washington state Attorney General Bob Ferguson, who alleges the Navy did not do enough to examine the flights’ impacts on people and wildlife.

Limited Availability of Tugs for Emergencies on Canada's Pacific Coast
A research report on the Availability of Tugs of Opportunity in Canada’s Pacific Region published by Clear Seas Centre for Responsible Marine Shipping indicates that Canada’s West Coast faces gaps in the availability of commercial tugs to serve as emergency towing vessels for ships in distress.

What Alaska's Pebble Mine fight means for Seattle Bristol Bay is a cornerstone of Washington's seafood industry. But many say a mine 20 years in the making could threaten all of it.
These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato (@) salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

Friday, June 28, 2019

Salish Sea News Week in Review June 28 2019

Salish Sea News Week in Review
June 28 2019


Aloha Stonewall Riots Friday!

The Stonewall riots were a series of spontaneous, violent demonstrations by members of the gay community against a police raid that began in the early morning hours of June 28, 1969, at the Stonewall Inn in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. They are widely considered to constitute the most important event leading to the gay liberation movement and the modern fight for LGBT rights in the United States. (Wikipedia)



Vancouver Aquarium agrees to cetacean ban in new 35-year lease agreement
The Vancouver Aquarium has agreed to a cetacean ban as part of a new 35-year lease agreement with the Vancouver Park Board. It's also dropping its legal action against the park board over lost revenue because of the ban.

Washington's Port Of Vancouver Says No To New Fossil Fuel Projects
Port of Vancouver commissioners passed a significant energy policy shift that shuts the door on any future bulk fossil fuel terminals. By a vote of 2 to 1, commissioners laid out a new statement: “the port chooses not to pursue new bulk fossil fuel terminals on port-owned industrial property.” 


Trash barge from Philippines to arrive in Vancouver on Saturday
Containers of Canadian trash that have festered in the Philippines for years are set to be returned to Canada by ship on the long weekend the country marks its 152nd birthday.



These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato (@) salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow @savepugetsound

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told