Friday, June 21, 2019

Salish Sea News Week in Review June 21 2019

Salish Sea News Week in Review
June 21 2019

Aloha Summer Solstice Friday!
The summer solstice, also known as midsummer, occurs when one of the Earth's poles has its maximum tilt toward the Sun. It happens twice yearly, once in each hemisphere. For that hemisphere, the summer solstice is when the Sun reaches its highest position in the sky and is the day with the longest period of daylight. (Wikipedia)

Trudeau cabinet approves Trans Mountain expansion project
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and his cabinet have again approved the Trans Mountain expansion project, a crucial next step for the much-delayed pipeline project designed to carry nearly a million barrels of oil from Alberta's oilpatch to the B.C. coast each day.


House of Commons declares a climate emergency ahead of pipeline decision   The House of Commons has passed a non-binding motion to declare a national climate emergency in Canada, kicking off a week that will test the Liberals' promise to balance environmental protection with economic development.

Bill to ban oil tankers in northern B.C. waters passes in Senate
A bill restricting oil tankers in British Columbia's northern waters has narrowly passed the Senate.Bill C-48 bans tankers carrying more than 12,500 metric tonnes of oil from docking along B.C.'s north coast, an area that stretches from the northern tip of Vancouver Island to the Alaska border.It passed in a close 49-to-46 vote Thursday evening.

E.P.A. Finalizes Its Plan to Replace Obama-Era Climate Rules
The Trump administration on Wednesday replaced former President Barack Obama’s effort to reduce planet-warming pollution from coal plants with a new rule that would allow plants to stay open longer and slow progress on cutting carbon emissions.

Remembering Lolita, an orca taken nearly 49 years ago and still in captivity at the Miami Seaquarium
Of all the southern residents taken during a series of captures beginning in the 1960s and ending in 1976, in which more than a third of the orcas that frequent Puget Sound were taken, all are dead today but one: Lolita, still performing in captivity at the Miami Seaquarium.

Judge gives Point Wells high-rise project another chance
A massive condo development proposed on Puget Sound has another shot at life. A judge has given a developer six more months to seek approval for approximately 3,000 condos at Point Wells, after Snohomish County denied the project last year.

These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather  which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato (@) salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow @savepugetsound

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

Friday, June 14, 2019

Salish Sea News Week in Review June 14 2019

Salish Sea News Week in Review
June 14 2019

Aloha Orca Action Month Friday!
Orca Month in June is a chance to celebrate one of our region’s most iconic wildlife species, but also an opportunity to reflect on the plight of these fragile creatures. Working together from all corners of the Salish Sea, we can restore the habitat orcas – and humans – call home. Join us for a month of educational and celebratory events to raise awareness of the threats facing our Southern Resident orca population and what we can do to protect them. Participate at events in Washington, Oregon and British Columbia.


A more humane country': Canada to ban keeping whales, dolphins in captivity
Animal welfare advocates are celebrating after the House of Commons voted Monday to ban keeping whales, dolphins and porpoises in captivity — in a move with long-term consequences for Canadian marine parks.

B.C. drought fears surge as rivers dry up across the province
Extreme hot dry weather has left streams and rivers across the province running low and that's creating drought conditions more commonly seen in late July.

Official: Canada to announce ban on single-use plastics
The Canadian government plans to announce it is moving to ban single-use plastics as early as 2021, a senior government official said late Sunday,

Port Of Kalama: Methanol Refinery Can’t Export For Fuel
Port of Kalama commissioners unanimously passed a lease amendment with a controversial methanol facility Wednesday night that prohibits the company from exporting its product for fuel.

In Washington state, stronger regulation has led to fewer pipeline problems
Incidents involving fuel and gas lines have continued to kill and maim unsuspecting people in the 20 years since 237,000 gallons of gasoline seeped from a large underground pipeline in Whatcom Falls Park, sparking a deadly fireball that rocked Bellingham.


Bullitt Foundation, a heavy hitter in the NW's environmental movement, will wind down its giving
The Bullitt Foundation, an agenda-setting funder of the Northwest environmental movement, plans to wind down a quarter-century of grant-giving that has pumped more than $200 million into efforts ranging from restoration projects on the Green River to climate activism, as it pushed the region toward a greener future.


These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather  which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato (@) salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow @savepugetsound

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

Friday, June 7, 2019

Salish Sea News Week in Review June 7 2019

Salish Sea News Week in Review
June 7 2019



Aloha Doughnut Friday!
National Doughnut Day, also known as National Donut Day, is an annual event that was started by the Chicago branch of the Salvation Army, first being held in 1938. It was created to honor the "Lassies," "Doughnut Girls," or "Doughnut Dollies" who had served doughnuts to servicemen in Europe during World War I. The aim of the day was also to be a fundraiser for Chicago's Salvation Army, in order to help the many people who were suffering on account of the Great Depression.


WA's top lawyer took a rare step to affirm tribal sovereignty — here's why that's a big deal
Under the new policy, the attorney general must get written consent from tribes before taking certain actions that affect them. That's something few have put into practice, experts say.

Numerous battles of Peninsula environmentalist remembered
Retired Dr. Eloise Kailin, a Sequim environmentalist whose activism stretched beyond her most recent fight — a successful battle against fluoridation of Port Angeles drinking water — died Saturday of age-related causes at her Sequim-area home, her son, Harvey Kailin, said Wednesday.

DFO to begin testing for harmful virus at B.C. fish farms
Testing for strains of a virus that is harmful to farmed Atlantic salmon in Norway will soon begin at B.C. fish farm operations, the federal fisheries minister announced Tuesday.

New orca calf reported in southern resident J pod
A new calf has been born to J pod. John Forde was out on the water near Tofino, B.C., when he spotted a baby orca alongside its mother, possibly J31.

Human Population Growth Threatens Endangered Whales
Population growth is threatening efforts to save Southern Resident killer whales, whose decline is not being treated with the urgency the crisis demands, officials said in a task force meeting in Washington state Monday.

Marine snail gains state endangered species listing
The marine snails that have been the focus of restoration efforts in Skagit County and surrounding areas for years are officially endangered. The state Department of Fish & Wildlife Commission made the decision Friday to officially list the pinto abalone as a state endangered species.

Scientists investigate spike in grey whale deaths on West Coast
U.S. government biologists have launched a special investigation into the deaths of at least 70 grey whales washed ashore in recent months along the U.S. and Canadian West Coast, from California to British Columbia to Alaska, many of them emaciated, officials said on Friday.

Rick Steves launches annual million-dollar commitment to carbon neutral travel
Edmonds-based travel authority Rick Steves has announced a new Climate Smart Commitment aimed at offsetting the carbon emitted by its tour members.
-----

These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather salishseanew.blogspot.com which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato (@) salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow @savepugetsound

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

Friday, May 31, 2019

Salish Sea News Week in Review May 31 2019

Salish Sea News Week in Review
May 31 2019

Aloha Smile Friday
You've probably heard that it takes more muscles to frown than it does to smile. But, somehow, over the years, most people tend to forget this. Babies smile about 400 times a day, while the average adult only smiles 20 times. Today is a day to fix this and to smile as much as possible. National Smile Day was created by Dr. Tim Stirneman and Jim Wojdyla of Compassionate Dental Care in Lake in the Hills, Illinois, to "share with the world what the power of a healthy smile can do."


Ferry hits whale in Elliott Bay while on Bainbridge Island run
Passengers on the ferry Wenatchee were shaken Tuesday night after the vessel collided with a whale in Elliott Bay. Whale-ferry collision in Seattle’s Elliott Bay a byproduct of humpback revival, and could become more common  Incidents like the collision Tuesday between a Washington state ferry and a juvenile humpback whale are likely to be repeated because whale migrations and ship traffic in the Salish Sea are both increasing, a veteran scientist predicts.

Washington First Nations oppose Canadian shipping terminal plan
Lummi, a Coast Salish nation near Bellingham, is one of four Indigenous communities from the state just south of B.C.'s Lower Mainland sending members to present their case at a federal review panel hearing on the proposed Roberts Bank terminal expansion on Saturday.


Conservation groups sound alarm over another sea lice outbreak in Clayoquot Sound
Conservation groups that monitor Clayoquot Sound are sounding the alarm for the second spring in a row about high levels of a parasite that can harm juvenile wild salmon.

Chinook bust on the Columbia: Spring returns worse than forecast on Northwest's largest river
Fish managers have had to downgrade their forecasts regarding spring chinook returning to the Columbia River twice, from an already gloomy outlook with returns so far at 30% below initial projections, according to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW)



These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato (@) salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow @savepugetsound

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

Friday, May 24, 2019

Salish Sea News: Week in Review May 24, 2019

Salish Sea News:
Week in Review May 24, 2019

Aloha Asparagus Friday!
Asparagus, from the genus family Asparagaceae, is made up of more than 200 species. The most common and economically important is garden asparagus, which is usually green with a purple-tinged top, but white asparagus is another common variety and is often grown in Europe. Asparagus was a delicacy of the ancient Romans and Greeks, and its name comes from the Greek word "asparagos." The name first appeared in print in English around 1000 CE.


Inslee signs budget, tax bills and orders $175M more to help salmon  Gov. Jay Inslee, determined to put more money toward helping salmon survival, on Tuesday directed the state to boost funding for court-ordered culvert repairs by $175 million over the next two years.


Low snowpack, hot spring lead to drought declaration for nearly half of Washington state 
Washington Gov. Jay Inslee declared drought Monday for nearly half of Washington watersheds, as the mountain snowpack that churns through hydropower dams, irrigates our state’s orchards and provides for fish continues to dwindle well below normal.


Drought: low snowpack, dry weather a concern across B.C., prairies
Drought forecasts from Agriculture Canada show most of British Columbia is abnormally dry or enduring some level of drought, similar to dry conditions that are being experienced across a swath of Western Canada.

Hostile Waters,Part 4: How our noise is hurting orcas’ search for salmon
Booming ships, boats and other traffic interfere with orcas' search for food. Calls and echolocation clicks are drowned out, making all their other problems worse.


Battle over orca whale-watch restrictions heats up in San Juan County
An initiative has been filed to increase the distance whale-watch boats must keep from endangered southern-resident orcas — followed immediately by a lawsuit earlier this week from several whale-watch companies to keep the measure off the ballot.

Vancouver Aquarium sues city, park board over cetacean ban
The Vancouver Aquarium is suing the city of Vancouver and the Vancouver Park Board over the 2017 cetacean ban, claiming it resulted in millions of dollars in lost revenue, and constituted a breach of contract.

Whales vs. trade: Environmentalists push back against proposed port terminal in Delta
A proposed new marine container terminal in Delta, B.C., is facing pushback from environmentalists who believe the project will threaten whales and the salmon they depend on for survival.

Southern resident orca matriarch J17 continues to decline, new photos show 
Concern is heightened for the survival of J17, an endangered southern resident orca who is continuing to decline, new photos show. Researcher John Durban, of the Southwest Fisheries Science Center of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, in his spring survey of the southern residents detected further emaciation in J17 since his last survey in fall 2018.

These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather  which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato (@) salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow @savepugetsound

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

Friday, May 17, 2019

Salish Sea News Week in Review May 17 2019

Salish Sea News Week in Review May 17 2019

Tapanuli orangutan [Tim Lehman]
Aloha Endangered Species Friday!
In 1973, President Richard Nixon, a Republican, signed a piece of monumental environmental legislation, the Endangered Species Act, into law. The United States Congress created Endangered Species Day in 2006 to be celebrated on the third Friday in May. The day is for learning why it's important to protect endangered species, for learning how to take part in protection efforts, and for celebrating species that have recovered as a result of these efforts.

Inslee, Ferguson denounce EPA move to ease water standards for Washington state
The Environmental Protection Agency proposes to ease Washington water-quality standards for chemicals discharged into state waterways, a move embraced by industry groups that sought the change and denounced as “illegal” by Gov. Jay Inslee and state Attorney General Bob Ferguson.

Canada: Sanctuaries and food for our endangered killer whales
Canada has announced big-scale measures to safeguard and feed endangered killer whales in the Salish Sea, a day after Gov. Jay Inslee signed into law measures to protect endangered orcas on the U.S. side of the border.

Public environmental assessment hearings underway on proposed Roberts Bank container terminal
The Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency has kicked off the public hearing process on the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority's proposed $2 billion to $3 billion Roberts Bank Terminal 2 project.

North Dakota to sue Washington state over oil train standard
North Dakota is preparing to sue Washington state over a new Washington law requiring oil shipped by rail through that state to have more of its volatile gases removed, which supporters say would reduce the risk of explosive and potentially deadly derailments.

It was 84 degrees near the Arctic Ocean this weekend as carbon dioxide hit its highest level in human history
Over the weekend, the climate system sounded simultaneous alarms. Near the entrance to the Arctic Ocean in northwest Russia, the temperature surged to 84 degrees Fahrenheit (29 Celsius).


These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather  which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe, send your name and email to msato (@) salishseacom.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate

Follow @savepugetsound

Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

Monday, May 13, 2019

A Deadly Wind: The 1962 Columbus Day Storm

A Deadly Wind: The 1962 Columbus Day Storm

Reviewed by Floyd McKay


The icons that define us are all around in this land west of the great mountains: the mountains themselves, the miles of giant trees, the powerful ocean. Our friends. Until they come to destroy us.

As they did on October 12, 1962, the day of the greatest windstorm in the modern history of the Pacific Northwest. We call it the Columbus Day Storm, a monster that killed as many as 65 people, destroyed billions of dollars of our built world and made permanent changes in the way we live.

John Dodge was 14 years old when the storms broke over his Olympia home, and he remembers the falling trees and flying debris of his neighborhood. A worse terror was waiting just a few miles away in Spanaway; seven-year-old Charley Brammer was outside his home when he was attacked by an adult African lion, liberated from a neighbor’s holding pen by the crashing trees. Ray Brammer wrestled with the lion and with the aid of a baseball bat saved his son’s life. Perhaps the most spectacular of many heroisms that harrowing night.

During his four-decade career on the Olympian, Dodge became a specialist in natural disasters, including the Mt. St. Helens eruption. He turned to the storm upon retirement, and has combined riveting personal stories with exhaustive scientific research to produce a book important to the entire Cascadia region—for the winds came ashore at San Francisco Bay and blew themselves out on Vancouver Island two days later.

Dodge reminds us of the pioneering nature of storm forecasting in 1962, using as a key example the Portland meteorologist Jack Capell, who sensed the approaching danger before his former U.S. Weather Bureau colleagues were willing to make the call. Capell’s breathless warning to his KGW radio and television listeners barely preceded the storm at it roared into the mid-Willamette Valley, the ultimate center for storm damage in the state. “The Columbus Day Storm was a freak of nature, a weather outlier, a beastly wind that caught weather forecasters flat-footed and dumbfounded,” Dodge declared.

Typhoon Freda was at the root of the Columbus Day storm, swooping ashore in northern California and southwest Oregon on Thursday, Oct. 11; five deaths were already recorded. None of today’s whiz-bang electronic systems were in place; Navy picket ships at sea were the major warning systems and communications were easily lost.

Oregon suffered 27 deaths, Washington 11; 17 were caused by falling trees. The region’s forests were clearcut in a 24-hour orgy of roaring noise and crashing timber. An estimated 15 billion board feet—enough to frame a million homes—was felled in the storm. Cleanup was massive, and dangerous, and the replacement forests were managed under a new paradigm called The Managed Forest. Many of the salvaged logs were shipped to Japan, where growth in wood-frame homes opened a new market. 

Prune and filbert orchards were destroyed in Oregon, and the prune industry never recovered—it was replaced by pinot noir grapes, a new industry growing in the rubble of the old. Dodge explains all this, in what is really quite a remarkable overview of a storm for the ages. Many witnesses are now gone; this book will remind their heirs of a remarkable natural disaster and the people who survived and built in its wake.

Hear author John Dodge at Bellingham's Chuckanut Radio Hour on May 21, 7 PM, at Whatcom Community College's Heiner Center.

Reviewer Floyd McKay resides in Bellinghan and is the author of Reporting The Oregon Story: How Activists and Visionaries Transformed A State.

*Old enough to remember the Columbus Day Storm? Share your memories and stories here.*