Friday, February 16, 2024

Salish Sea News Week in Review February 16, 2024

 

Aloha Kyoto Protocol Friday!
Kyoto Protocol Day honors the Kyoto Protocol, an international agreement to reduce greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to global warming. The day takes place on February 16, on the anniversary of the date that the Kyoto Protocol took effect in 2005. The protocol has been ratified by 191 countries and the European Union. It was signed by the United States, but not ratified, and they dropped out of the protocol in 2001. After initially participating, Canada has since withdrawn from the protocol.


World temperatures go above 1.5 C warming for a year: EU scientists
The average temperature for the past 12 months was 1.52 C above pre-industrial times, according to the Copernicus Climate Change Service. 

What do ‘clean’ and ‘green’ actually mean? Canadian watchdog receives complaints about environmental claims by Shell, RBC, Enbridge
The list of companies whose marketing is being accused of deceiving Canadians about their environmental commitments continues to grow.

They started building a bulkhead for a new home on Hood Canal. Then the feds found out
A judge ruled the structure was built in Hood Canal without a proper permit, and now the homeowner faces a $250,000 fine. 

Many birds are named for enslavers, colonizers and white supremacists. That’s about to change
Black birdwatchers on the practice’s racist history, the move to rename North America’s feathered species and other changes needed to make birding inclusive. 

First Nations group criticizes federal fisheries department
An Indigenous-led group is criticizing what it says is the "gross mismanagement" of aquaculture in British Columbia by the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, as it calls for a separation of its regulatory and promotional responsibilities.

PFAS in Washington’s well water could make you sick
‘Forever chemicals’ linked to ailments from high cholesterol to cancer are in our clearest aquifers — but steep costs pose cleanup challenges.

Sea Change: How and When Washington’s Catch Ebbs and Flows
From smelt to sea cucumbers, the seafood we take from Northwest waters is ever-changing.

Rays of hope for kelp and climate in south Salish Sea

Some pockets of bull kelp vital for sea life off southern Vancouver Island and B.C.’s Gulf Islands are proving to be resilient to rising sea temperatures and marine heat waves, a new University of Victoria study has found.

Whidbey diver-turned-citizen scientist provides ongoing data
Longtime Whidbey diver Jan Kocian has circled the island exploring the marine environment. It looks a lot different than it used to, he said. “That diversity is gone,” he said. “It’s unfortunately in every location on the island. The diving is not even close to what it used to be. I know I sound like an old guy.”

These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe at no cost to the weekday news clips, send your name and email to mikesato772 at gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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Friday, February 9, 2024

Salish Sea News Week in Review February 9 2024


Aloha Bob Marley Friday!
Robert Nesta Marley OM (b. Feb. 9, 1945) was a Jamaican reggae singer, guitarist, and songwriter. Considered one of the pioneers of the genre, his music fused elements of reggae, ska, and rocksteady, and he was renowned for his distinctive vocal and songwriting style.


Record number of Bigg’s Killer Whales sightings in 2023
More than 1,400 Bigg’s Killer Whales sightings were reported in the Salish Sea in 2023, according to the Orca Behaviour Institute. This number surpasses the 2022 record by about 200 sightings, the institute says, and contributes to an eight-fold increase in sightings from 10 years ago.

WA’s snowpack languishes with little hope for the months ahead
Snowpack across the entire state sits below normal levels, in some places less than half what an average winter might bring. “It’s worse than I expected,” state climatologist Nick Bond said.

Out of gas: Inslee’s oil transparency bill stalls in Legislature
The bill was a top climate priority for the governor this session but critics questioned the cost and whether the state could keep sensitive corporate data safe from hackers.

Energy company is back in court for endangering fish on the Puyallup River
Electron Hydro and its CEO last year agreed to pay more than a million dollars in fines for their illegal use of artificial turf in the Puyallup River four years ago. On Tuesday, Electron Hydro’s owners will be back in court – this time in a suit brought by the Puyallup Tribe under the Endangered Species Act.

B.C. groups request review of tire chemical linked to salmon deaths
Peter Ross, senior scientist at Raincoast Conservation Foundation, says the mystery of coho dying in urban waterways had persisted for years, until a 2020 study uncovered the role of a particular chemical used in tire rubber.

Environmental groups celebrate court ruling as a win for at-risk birds in B.C. and beyond
Court case was launched against backdrop of old growth logging protests on Vancouver Island.

Loggerhead sea turtle found at Pedder Bay
The turtle, typically found much farther south, was rushed to the Vancouver Aquarium suffering from hypothermia.

Thousands of Chinook wasted as bycatch in B.C. fishery, new report finds
Nearly 30,000 Chinook salmon were wasted as bycatch in the Canadian trawl fishery, which was targeting hake and walleye pollock, a new report from Canadian fisheries officials found.

UW's Burke Museum working with Native tribes to repatriate Indigenous artifacts
Museums across Washington state may no longer display some Native artifacts without permission under a new federal rule.


These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe at no cost to the weekday news clips, send your name and email to mikesato772 at gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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Friday, February 2, 2024

Salish Sea News Week in Review February 2, 2024

 


Aloha Groundhog Friday!
The groundhog, also known as a woodchuck, is a rodent of the family Sciuridae, belonging to the group of large ground squirrels known as marmots. The groundhog is a lowland creature of North America; it is found through much of the Eastern United States, across Canada and into Alaska. Groundhog Day is an annual event when groundhogs are brought outside and are observed to see if they see their shadow or not. If they see their shadow, it is said that there will be six more weeks of winter. If they do not, it means the weather will be mild in the upcoming weeks, and spring will come early.

Plastic bag bans have already prevented billions of bags from being used, report finds
Over the past several years, U.S. cities and states have passed hundreds of policies restricting the sale and distribution of single-use plastic bags. A new report  says these laws have largely succeeded in their goal of reducing plastic bag use.

Endangered baby orca J60 missing, presumed dead
On Saturday, a three-person team from the Center for Whale Research spotted most of J Pod in Washington’s San Juan Channel between San Juan Island and Shaw Island.  They documented the orcas from their research boat, with telephoto lenses and a federally permitted drone, for nearly two hours and observed every member of J Pod -- except J60. 

Trans Mountain expansion hits 'technical issues,' possibly delaying completion
The Crown corporation building the massive project, which had previously stated it expected to have the pipeline in-service near the end of the first quarter, said Monday it has once again run into construction challenges in B.C. and pushed that date back.

BC population to hit 7.9 million by 2046, as growth rate soars: report
The new B.C. government report based on publicly available data predicts a 44-per-cent population increase compared to the 2023 population of 5.5 million.

The door to B.C.’s liquefied natural gas export sector is about to open. Here’s what you need to know
As LNG Canada completes construction and prepares to bring operations online, the export facility could 'open a gateway' for other projects to proceed. But B.C.’s gas export sector faces stricter emissions policies, unpredictable market shifts and climate disasters as it tries to maintain its place in an uncertain future.

Reviving the Samish Tribe’s kelp
Researchers are documenting the decline of once-plentiful kelp beds in an effort to reverse the trend. 

Lawsuits fly, as regulators come to grips with a toxic tire chemical
A lawsuit filed against 13 of the largest tire manufacturers in this country seeks to ban the chemical 6PPD from its universal use in tires, or else force tire companies to pay for stormwater-mitigation measures that can remove the chemical or otherwise protect salmon.


These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe at no cost to the weekday news clips, send your name and email to mikesato772 at gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate


Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

Friday, January 26, 2024

Salish Sea News Week in Review January 26 2024

 


Aloha Lego Friday!
Lego bricks and other items are manufactured by the Lego Group, which is based in Billund, Denmark. It was in this city in 1932 that a carpenter by the name of Ole Kirk Christiansen began making wooden toys. Two years later, his company began being called "Lego," which came from leg godt, the Danish phrase meaning "play well." The company started making plastic toys in 1947, and interlocking bricks in 1949. Called "Automatic Binding Bricks," they were based on Kiddicraft Self-Locking Bricks. On January 28, 1958, Christiansen's son, Godtfred Kirk Christiansen, submitted an application for a patent for a "Toy Building Brick."

Fixing the cormorant disaster on the Columbia: ‘How could this have come out any worse?’
A colony of seabirds was shooed away from the mouth of the Columbia River, only to relocate to a bridge. That's when the problems really began.

A new study finds a critical vitamin for salmon in rivers
From dams to drought, salmon face a lot of threats in the West. Add thiamine deficiency to the list. Thiamine, also known as vitamin B1, is critical for salmon health. Juvenile fish can die without enough of the nutrient.

Learning to Plan for the Next 500 Years
A first-of-its-kind program at Vancouver Island University trains students to steward Indigenous Protected and Conserved Areas.

Proposal would require oil handlers, transporters to prove ability to pay for spills
The Washington Department of Ecology is proposing rules regarding financial responsibility requirements for oil handling facilities and vessels ranging from $500,000 to $1 billion based on vessel type and size; financial responsibility for oil handling facilities – including refineries, terminals, and pipelines – would range from $5 million to $300 million.

Ports take steps to reduce emissions with $12M infrastructure grant
Seattle and Tacoma now have a $12-million-dollar federal infrastructure grant to focus on short-haul trucking whose emissions pollute nearby neighborhoods, warm the climate and pollute the immediate environment of the drivers while they’re on the job.

New fossils suggest kelp forests have swayed in the seas for at least 32 million years
A study published in PNAS presents new evidence that the first kelps were much older than we once suspected, dating back 32 million years — well before the arrival of many of their present-day animal inhabitants.

Green hydrogen plans take shape for former Alcoa site at Cherry Point
The closed Alcoa aluminum smelter near Ferndale could be redeveloped as a green hydrogen factory if the prospective new owner can navigate a series of hurdles.

If you like to watch: Divers capture dramatic battle between seal and octopus
Maxime Veilleux and Matteo Endrizzi were finishing their sunset dive off Nanoose Bay on Sunday and heading to the shore when something unusual caught their eyes.

How an Indigenous rights battle in WA changed tribal law, from fishing to culverts
Fifty years ago, a landmark federal court case brought against Washington state reaffirmed the treaty rights of Native Americans to fish in traditional waters and shorelines. From culvert rehab to dam removal, 1974's "Boldt Decision" has expanded far beyond fishing to legally empower tribes' ability to protect natural resources.


These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe at no cost to the weekday news clips, send your name and email to mikesato772 at gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate


Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

Friday, January 19, 2024

Salish Sea News Week in Review January 19 2024


Dolly Parton (1977) [RCA Records]

Aloha Dolly Parton Birthday Friday!
Dolly Rebecca Parton (born January 19, 1946) is an American singer-songwriter and actress. She has received 11 Grammy Awards out of 50 nominations, including the Lifetime Achievement Award; ten Country Music Association Awards, including Entertainer of the Year and is one of only seven female artists to win the Country Music Association's Entertainer of the Year Award; five Academy of Country Music Awards, also including Entertainer of the Year; four People's Choice Awards; and three American Music Awards. She is also in a select group to have received at least one nomination from the Academy Awards, Grammy Awards, Tony Awards, and Emmy Awards. In 1999, Parton was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame. In 2005, she received the National Medal of Arts and in 2022, she was nominated for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, a nomination she had initially declined but ultimately accepted, and was subsequently inducted.


How the Boldt decision 50 years ago remade Pacific Northwest fishing
The Boldt decision of 1974 was the result of sacrifices made by Native fishers and their families who were jailed and beaten while defending their rights to fish.

BP bought a sacred place. Now Lummi Nation is preparing again to fend off development
Tribal leaders opposed the $50 million sale, which came as a surprise to them. They want the assurance that Xwe’chi’eXen (pronounced wuh-chee-uh-kin), which for thousands of years has supported fishing, ceremony and social gatherings, would be protected in perpetuity.

‘No excuse’: feds withheld key information when a Coastal GasLink site flooded
Documents reveal Fisheries and Oceans Canada was aware of numerous issues at a pipeline construction site on Wet’suwet’en territory but did not disclose information to concerned organizations or the media. 

Voters to decide on repeal of Washington cap-and-trade program
The fate of Washington’s primary program to combat climate change will be in the hands of voters to uphold or reject this November. Initiative 2117, certified for the ballot on Tuesday, would erase the two-year-old Climate Commitment Act.

This humble fish may help the Supreme Court weaken the ‘administrative state’
In a pair of cases involving herring fishermen, conservative justices could toss out the precedent known as Chevron, which gives power to federal government agencies.

This Canadian pipeline giant wants an exemption from climate rules
Internal government memos show TC Energy lobbied for carveouts exempting methane and LNG plants from one of Canada’s key climate policies targeting the oil and gas industry.

No turning back: The largest dam removal in U.S. history begins
The largest dam removal in U.S. history entered a critical phase this week, with the lowering of dammed reservoirs on the Klamath River. On Thursday, the gate on a 16-foot-wide bypass tunnel at the base of Iron Gate dam, the lowest of those slated to be removed, was opened from a crack to 36 inches. 

Island mill fined $25K for dumping highly toxic waste into ocean
Paper Excellence's Crofton mill has been slapped with a $25,500 penalty for releasing more than one million litres of toxic waste into the Salish Sea.

RCMP officers mocked people being arrested at Wet'suwet'en blockade as 'orcs' and 'ogre'
RCMP officers referred to First Nations pipeline opponents as "orcs" and "ogre" during a police raid at a blockade of Coastal GasLink pipeline construction in November 2021, according to audio recordings played in court Wednesday.

These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe at no cost to the weekday news clips, send your name and email to mikesato772 at gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

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Friday, January 12, 2024

Salish Sea News Week in Review January 12 2024


Aloha Led Zepplin Friday!
Led Zeppelin, the debut studio album by English rock band Led Zeppelin, was released on January 12, 1969, in the USA. Led Zeppelin's front cover, which was chosen by Jimmy Page, features a black-and-white image of the German zeppelin Hindenburg photographed by Sam Shere on May 6, 1937, when the airship burst into flames while landing at Lakehurst, New Jersey. The image refers to the origin of the band's name itself: When Page, Beck and The Who's Keith Moon and John Entwistle were discussing the idea of forming a group, Moon joked, "It would probably go over like a lead balloon", and Entwistle reportedly replied, "a lead zeppelin!"

Winter drought holds potential for dire 2024 B.C. fire season
Fire ecologist Lori Daniels admits 'coexistent' seems counterintuitive but is necessary with climate change edging toward a hotter, drier future.

Trial of prominent Wet'suwet'en leader and land defenders begins
Three accused are charged with criminal contempt over Coastal GasLink pipeline blockades.

Supreme Court denies Alaska’s bid to revive the copper and gold Pebble Mine proposal blocked by EPA
The Supreme Court on Monday rejected Alaska’s bid to revive a proposed copper and gold mine that was blocked by the Environmental Protection Agency.

2023 was the hottest year on record — by a long shot
According to the European Union's Copernicus Climate Change Service (C3S), 2023 was 1.48 C warmer than the pre-industrial average from 1850-1900, beating out 2016's record of 1.25 C. 

When you drink bottled water, you're drinking lots and lots of plastic particles
New study finds most of the plastic comes from bottle itself, filtration.

Scientists worldwide are immersed in studies of a deadly tire chemical
A tire-related chemical found to kill coho salmon and other fish has come under intense worldwide investigation ever since Puget Sound researchers isolated the singular compound three years ago from among thousands of pollutants residing in stormwater.

These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe at no cost to the weekday news clips, send your name and email to mikesato772 at gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate


Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told

 

Friday, January 5, 2024

Salish Sea News Week in Review| January 5 2024



Aloha National Bird Friday
National Bird Day was created by Born Free USA (which was the Animal Protection Institute until 2007) and The Avian Welfare Coalition, to reduce the suffering of wild and captive birds. The day is meant to raise awareness of the destructive bird trade and cruel breeding mills, and to work for the improvement of conditions for birds already in captivity.

Baby orca update: It’s a boy!
Oca surveyor Dave Ellifrit at the Center for Whale Research confirmed that the whale, less than a week old, is male.

Despite opposition and environmental violations, major B.C. pipeline project nearly complete
A controversial pipeline meant to transport natural gas across northern British Columbia has passed a major milestone as TC Energy announced it has finished installing pipe on its Coastal GasLink pipeline project.

Those breathing poorer air in WA live sicker, die younger, report says
Residents in parts of Washington disproportionately impacted by poor air quality are, on average, sicker and die younger compared with the rest of the state, a new report https://apps.ecology.wa.gov/publications/UIPages/documents/2302115.pdf from the Washington Department of Ecology found.

Avian influenza death of Alaska polar bear is a global first and a sign of the virus’ persistence
The highly pathogenic influenza that has already killed vast numbers of birds and numerous mammals continues to circulate in the world’s wild populations.

State Department of Labor and Industries tightens oil refinery safety regulations
The state Department of Labor and Industries announced last week that it would adopt regulations that strengthen process safety management in the five Washington refineries.

'Prolific' killer whale matriarch Wake presumed dead after nearly a year without a sighting
Decades-old orca T46 was last spotted near Alert Bay, B.C., in February 2023.

Victoria’s Christmas Bird Count: Delight and decline
The birders counted more than 85,000 individuals of 143 species.

Conservation group buys out hunting rights in B.C.'s Great Bear Rainforest to protect wildlife
The Raincoast Conservation Foundation, based in Sidney, B.C., said Thursday that it raised $1.92 million over two years to buy the rights from hunters that cover roughly a quarter, or 18,000 square kilometres, of the Great Bear Rainforest on the province's north and central coast.


These news clips are a selection of weekday clips collected in Salish Sea News and Weather which is compiled as a community service by Mike Sato. To subscribe at no cost to the weekday news clips, send your name and email to mikesato772 at gmail.com. Your email information is never shared and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Salish Sea News: Communicate, Educate, Advocate


Salish Sea Communications: Truth Well Told